Pennsylvania Abolition Society

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  • He became an active and leading member of The Pennsylvania Abolition Society.
  • Under these circumstances, the Pennsylvania Abolition Society was frequently called upon to protect the rights of colored people. Cited from Isaac T. Hopper, by L. Maria Child
  • The Pennsylvania Abolition Society still exists, dedicated to the cause of racial justice.
  • George Stephens became quite well educated, likely in schools operated by the Quakers and the Pennsylvania Abolition Society.
  • The larger institutions were mainly supported by State and charitable organizations of which the Society of Friends and the Pennsylvania Abolition Society were the most important. Cited from The Education Of The Negro Prior To 1861, by Carter Godwin Woodson
  • The principal organized bodies to advocate this reform were the Pennsylvania Abolition Society and the New York Manumission Society.
  • It is probable that his connection with the Pennsylvania Abolition Society was the means of enlisting his talents and exertions in this important service. Cited from The Underground Railroad, by William Still
  • From the time of the reorganization of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, in 1787, anti-slavery sentiment became active. Cited from Suppression of the African Slave Trade to the US, by W. E. B. Du Bois
  • The principal organized bodies to advocate these reforms in the north were the Pennsylvania Abolition Society and the New York Manumission Society.
  • To the consternation of many, Dr. Rush still owned Grubber when he joined the Pennsylvania Abolition Society in 1784.
  • By 1837, with financial help from the Quakers and the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, ten private schools for blacks were operating in Philadelphia.
  • The state law was challenged by French colonial refugees from Saint-Domingue, who brought slaves with them, but defended by the Pennsylvania Abolition Society.
  • In 1851, alongside William Still, chairman of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, she helped escaped slaves along the Underground Railroad on their way to Canada.
  • He became committed to abolitionism as an adult, joining the Pennsylvania Abolition Society in 1842, and elected its Secretary in 1848.
  • Hopper became an active and leading member of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, whose members frequently worked to protect the rights of African Americans, as well as to seek the end of slavery in the United States.
  • In the 1790s Booth preached in the abolitionist cause, and joined the Pennsylvania Abolition Society.
  • He was a founder and first president of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, president of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, and for forty years served as a trustee of the University of Pennsylvania.
  • The Pennsylvania Abolition Society took guardianship of the Africans, gave them the last name "Ganges" and dispersed them locally via indentures.
  • The Pennsylvania Abolition Society saw to the training of this group from Unity Valley Pen, Saint Ann Parish, in manual trades and domestic service.
  • He was a founder and first president of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, president of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, and for 40 years a trustee of the University of Pennsylvania.
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