peltate

All Noun Adjective Verb
101 examples (0.02 sec)
  • In every instance the previously existing shape of the leaf must have decided whether peltate or pitcher-like leaves would be formed. Cited from Species and Varieties, by Hugo DeVries
  • From the evidence of the lime-tree we may conclude that normal peltate leaves may have originated in the same way. Cited from Species and Varieties, by Hugo DeVries
  • They are typically found in subtropical forests and are tuberous plants with heart shaped peltate leaves.
  • Leaves are usually lobed or otherwise divided, sometimes peltate, opposite or alternate and usually have stipules.
  • Their mouth is surrounded by a twenty of peltate tentacles.
  • Bark - smooth; Wood - yellow, strong, heavy; young branches rough with peltate scales.
  • However, it is not unique to these two taxa, as mature plants of many Nepenthes species display slightly peltate leaves.
  • The upper surface of the leaf is glaucous; the underside has a light yellow-brown peltate bloom.
  • Curiously, the peltate leaf attachment that is so characteristic of this species is not shown.
  • The leaves of adult Cecropia species are large and peltate, almost circular in circumference.
  • The peltate leaves are alternate, simple, glabrous, long and wide.
  • Its apex is acute to obtuse and may even be slightly peltate.
  • D. marchantii produces small, circular, peltate carnivorous leaves along stiff stems that can be high.
  • D. microphylla produces small, circular, peltate carnivorous leaves along erect stems that can be high.
  • D. moorei produces small, circular, peltate carnivorous leaves along glabrous stems that can be long.
  • These species are distinguished by their subpeltate to peltate lamina.
  • They often have peltate scales, as opposed to the imbricate cones described above, though some have imbricate scales.
  • They remain flat, become peltate and exhibit a shape which in some way holds a middle position between the pennyworts and the lemon-scented eucalyptus. Cited from Species and Varieties, by Hugo DeVries
  • It has an acute or obtuse apex that may rarely be sub-peltate.
  • Leaves have a peltate blade base, meaning the insertion of the petiole is at the center of the leaf.
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