pardon of Nixon

19 examples (0.02 sec)
  • The trust the American people had in him was severely and rapidly tarnished by his pardon of Nixon.
  • This status plus Ford's pardon of Nixon caused politicians in both major parties to view Ford as vulnerable.
  • Ford's pardon of Nixon caused his popularity, as measured by public-opinion polls, to plummet.
  • Ford's pardon of Nixon played a major role in his defeat in the 1976 presidential election against Jimmy Carter.
  • His successor, Gerald R. Ford, a moderate Republican, issued a preemptive pardon of Nixon, ending the investigations of him.
  • In presenting the award to Ford, Senator Ted Kennedy said that he had initially been opposed to the pardon of Nixon, but later stated that history had proved Ford to have made the correct decision.
  • With Gerald Ford's pardon of Nixon soon after his resignation in 1974, the Democrats used the "corruption" issue to make major gains in the off-year elections.
  • McGovern said President Gerald R. Ford's subsequent September 1974 pardon of Nixon was difficult to understand given that Nixon's subordinates were going to prison.
  • It was an embarrassment for Carter's administration, particularly as it occurred soon after President Nixon's Watergate scandal and President Ford's pardon of Nixon just before he could be impeached.
  • Saddled with a poor economy, the fall of South Vietnam, and paying a heavy political price for his pardon of Nixon, Ford first faced serious opposition from within his own party, when he was challenged for the Republican Party's nomination by former California governor Ronald Reagan.
  • They described several episodes where Haig misled the president and others, particularly those surrounding the court battles over Nixon's White House tape recordings, and Ford's eventual pardon of Nixon in September 1974.
  • Ford's pardon of Nixon just before the 1974 midterm elections was not well received, and the Democrats made major gains, bringing to power a generation of young liberal activists, many of them suspicious of the military and the CIA.
  • President Gerald Ford had squandered his early popularity with an unconditional pardon of Nixon and his perceived mishandling of the recession, and by late 1975 had slumped badly in national polls.
  • In 1974, Burditt ran against Adlai Stevenson III for the US Senate, but lost due to a nationwide wave of anti-Republican sentiment following the Ford pardon of Nixon.
  • Moreover, Packwood had distanced himself from Watergate, calling for Nixon's impeachment and denouncing Gerald Ford's pardon of Nixon.
  • Nixon was succeeded by Vice President Gerald Ford as President, who on September 8, 1974, issued a full and unconditional pardon of Nixon, immunizing him from prosecution for any crimes he had "committed or may have committed or taken part in" as president.
  • These elections, as part of the usual pattern of the Six-year itch, were held in the wake of the Watergate scandal, Richard M. Nixon's resignation from the presidency, and Gerald Ford's subsequent pardon of Nixon.
  • The U.S. Senate elections of 1974 were held in the wake of the Watergate scandal, Richard M. Nixon's resignation from the presidency, and Gerald Ford's subsequent pardon of Nixon.
  • On November 12, 1999, Ziegler was due to participate by telephone in a television panel discussion that included several former Nixon and Ford aides, including his successor as White House Press Secretary, Jerald terHorst, who resigned in protest at President Ford's pardon of Nixon.