parallel to the image plane

17 examples (0.03 sec)
  • The entire subject can be in focus, even if it is not parallel to the image plane.
  • If a subject plane is parallel to the image plane, parallel lines in the subject remain parallel in the image.
  • With this condition, a planar subject that is not parallel to the image plane can be completely in focus.
  • The flags were arranged to lie on a plane parallel to the image plane of the photographer.
  • The orthographic viewing volume is a rectangular box, where both the near and far viewing planes are parallel to the image plane.
  • The lens plane is a plane parallel to the image plane at the lens; all rays pass through a single point on the lens plane, namely the lens itself.
  • Thus at the hyperfocal distance, the DoF on a plane parallel to the image plane extends a distance of J on either side of the PoF.
  • If the subject plane is not parallel to the image plane, it will be in focus only along a line where it intersects the PoF, as illustrated in Figure 1.
  • If a planar subject (such as the side of a building) is also parallel to the image plane, it can coincide with the PoF, and the entire subject can be rendered sharply.
  • Shift is a displacement of the lens parallel to the image plane that allows adjusting the position of the subject in the image area without changing the camera angle; in effect the camera can be aimed with the shift movement.
  • The Scheimpflug principle is a geometric rule that describes the orientation of the plane of focus of an optical system (such as a camera) when the lens plane is not parallel to the image plane.
  • "Tilt-shift" encompasses two different types of movements: rotation of the lens plane relative to the image plane, called tilt, and movement of the lens parallel to the image plane, called shift.
  • When the lens axis is not perpendicular to the image plane, the POF is no longer parallel to the image plane; the ability to rotate the POF is known as the Scheimpflug principle.
  • With some subjects, such as landscapes, the wedge-shaped DoF is a good fit to the scene, and satisfactory sharpness can often be achieved with a smaller lens f -number (larger aperture) than would be required if the PoF were parallel to the image plane.
  • On a plane parallel to the image plane, the DoF is equally distributed above and below the PoF; in Figure 5, the distances y n and y f on the plane VP are equal.
  • Tilting the lens relies on the Scheimpflug principle to rotate the plane of focus away from parallel to the image plane; this can be used either to have all parts of an inclined subject sharply rendered, or to restrict sharpness to a small part of a scene.
  • When the lens axis is perpendicular to the image plane, as is normally the case, the plane of focus (POF) is parallel to the image plane, and the DOF extends between parallel planes on either side of the POF.