overcast stitch

39 examples (0.04 sec)
  • There are two methods of creating an embroidered overcast stitch.
  • A soft material, like Coton a repriser, makes the best padding for the overcasting stitches. Cited from Encyclopedia of Needlework, by Therese de Dillmont
  • If you do not make enough overcasting stitches to tighten the two threads, the bars will be loose and untidy and spoil the general appearance of the work. Cited from Encyclopedia of Needlework, by Therese de Dillmont
  • In embroidery, an overcast stitch is a raised line stitch used on even-weave fabrics.
  • A blanket stitch, used to finish edges of wool blankets, is another common overcast stitch.
  • Overcast stitch in embroidery is practically a very short raised satin stitch. Cited from Embroidery and Tapestry Weaving, by Grace Christie
  • All depends on the fineness and regularity of the stitches; they must be worked in overcast stitch. Cited from Beeton's Book of Needlework, by Isabella Beeton
  • The initials are embroidered in raised slanting overcast stitch, and should be worked with great regularity. Cited from Beeton's Book of Needlework, by Isabella Beeton
  • This word is worked in plain satin stitch, the ornamentation in overcast stitch. Cited from Beeton's Book of Needlework, by Isabella Beeton
  • Overcast stitch is one of several types of sewing stitches, this type being used on a raw, or unfinished, seam or edge.
  • POINT DE FESTON is worked by a series of overcast stitches, as seen by illustration 506, which clearly shows the manner of working. Cited from Beeton's Book of Needlework, by Isabella Beeton
  • The letters "J.C." are worked in raised satin and overcast stitch, the thickest part of each letter being worked in scallops. Cited from Beeton's Book of Needlework, by Isabella Beeton
  • The threads are covered with an overcast stitch, and alternate squares of those that recur over the space are decorated with a cross. Cited from Embroidery and Tapestry Weaving, by Grace Christie
  • Lay the prepared patches on a table and put them in place by referring to the design, and then commence sewing the edges together with an overcast stitch on the wrong side. Cited from Embroidery and Tapestry Weaving, by Grace Christie
  • A straight overcast stitch is used for finishing edges in eyelets and cutwork fabric.
  • The threads that were left are next covered with an overcast stitch, the adjoining ones in each case are caught together in the centre in order to form the X shape that recurs along the pattern. Cited from Embroidery and Tapestry Weaving, by Grace Christie
  • They can be clustered in bunches in different ways with ornamental stitches added, or be entirely covered over with darning or overcast stitches in such a way as to form a pattern. Cited from Embroidery and Tapestry Weaving, by Grace Christie
  • This simple insertion is worked in raised satin stitch, the stems alone excepted; these are embroidered in overcast stitch. Cited from Beeton's Book of Needlework, by Isabella Beeton
  • Then, with an overcast stitch that must not be allowed to pierce the under surface, join all the edges together, and cover the stitches with a finishing cord or braid. Cited from Embroidery and Tapestry Weaving, by Grace Christie
  • The leaves and flowers are worked in satin stitch; the eyelet-holes and stems in overcast stitch. Cited from Beeton's Book of Needlework, by Isabella Beeton