onerous as

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  • Onerous as these terms were, the agreement came not a moment too soon. Cited from The Pirates of Malabar, and An Englishwoman in India, by John Biddulph
  • Heavy and onerous as the responsibility might be, it had been placed in her hands. Cited from A College Girl, by Mrs. George de Horne Vaizey
  • They had made rules such as those regarding the sale of party memberships so onerous as to give Martin an unsurmountable advantage.
  • We all pay heavy taxes to other people's eyes; but on none is the levy quite so onerous as on the patients of a model hospital! Cited from Half a Century, by Jane Grey Cannon Swisshelm
  • While such regulation through disclosure hovers with a relatively light touch, self dealing rules become more onerous as transactions become more significant.
  • In practice this becomes computationally onerous as k and N increase so it is probably only worth using exact tests for small samples.
  • This eliminated the previous property requirements that had grown onerous as more of the population moved to jobs in commerce or manufacturing rather than agriculture.
  • But, fortunately, the duty which is given to me to-night is not so onerous as might be implied in the sentiment that has called me up. Cited from Modern Eloquence: Vol II, After-Dinner Speeches E-O, by Various
  • He made the Toros' lease terms at the Gardens as onerous as possible.
  • The rule was particularly onerous as there were no attorneys in the colony who hadn't arrived there as convicts.
  • Marjorie stopped to acknowledge the introduction, then onerous as was the task, she went staunchly to it. Cited from Marjorie Dean, College Sophomore, by Pauline Lester
  • He deliberately made the Toros' lease terms at the Gardens as onerous as possible.
  • The Americans have contrived in every way to make the common people eligible to the jury, and to render the service as little onerous as possible. Cited from American Institutions, by Alexis de Tocqueville
  • Indeed the new regulations are so onerous as to be nearly impossible to implement without paying such a high cost for a cart as to be unfeasible.
  • Membership was as onerous as it was honourable, not only within the school precints but anywhere. Cited from The Soul of a Child, by Edwin Bjorkman
  • Difficult and onerous as is the burden, we are commencing to place duty on the individual, and in that respect we are not in the least a decadent generation. Cited from The Foundations of Personality, by Abraham Myerson
  • If the second class has the power of making the laws, it will certainly not be lavish of taxes, because nothing is so onerous as a large impost which is levied upon a small income. Cited from American Institutions, by Alexis de Tocqueville
  • Voice recognition managers should take care to ensure that the impositions on MT autonomy are not so onerous as to outweigh its benefits.
  • If women endure on our behalf the great public burden of providing future citizens for the community, the least we can do for them in return is to render that burden as honourable and as little onerous as possible. Cited from Post-Prandial Philosophy, by Grant Allen
  • His position in the school did not give much scope to his ambition, but the salary he received was ample enough to pay his expenses, while the duties were not so onerous as to engross all his time. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 2, No. 11, September, 1857, by Various
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