onely they

9 examples (0.03 sec)
  • Came of the creek guard and nothing remarkable hapned onely they enemy fired at our fatigue party but did no damage at night upon the door guard. Cited from Military Journals of Two Private Soldiers, 1758-1775, Abraham Tomlinson
  • Seruice and ceremonies haue they none at all, onely they are woont to worship heauen. Cited from Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, Vol. 11, by Richard Hakluyt
  • These onely they plant, the other Fruits of Pleasure plant themselves, the seeds of the ripe Fruits shedding and falling on the ground naturally spring up again. Cited from Historical Relation Of The Island Ceylon In The East Indies, Robert Knox
  • They are of divers and sundry sorts, some they plant, and some grow wild; those that grow wild in the Woods are as good, onely they are more scarce and grow deeper, and so more difficult to be plucked up. Cited from Historical Relation Of The Island Ceylon In The East Indies, Robert Knox
  • Therby to be in honour had and in reuerence But onely they labour for theyr pryuate auayle. Cited from The Ship of Fools, Volume 1-2, by Sebastian Brandt
  • Now for our Irish warres, We must supplant those rough rug-headed Kernes, Which liue like venom, where no venom else But onely they, haue priuiledge to liue. Cited from Richard II, by William Shakespeare
  • But the rigorousnes of the tempest was such, and the force of the yce so great, that not onely they burst and spoyled the foresaid prouision, but likewise so raised the sides of the ships, that it was pitifull to behold, and caused the hearts of many to faint. Cited from Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, Vol. 12, by Richard Hakluyt
  • The pasture vplond being, dried away with the heate of the Sonne: They sieke downe to the marshe, and lowe groundes, for the whiche onely they be often at debate. Cited from Principal Navigations, V6, by Richard Hakluyt
  • Ne onely they that dwell in lowly dust, The sonnes of darknes and of ignoraunce; But they whom thou, great love, by doome uniust Didst to the type of honour earst advaunce; 70 They now, puft up with sdeignfull insolence, Despise the brood of blessed Sapience. Cited from The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser, Volume 5, by Edmund Spenser