onely by

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  • In some parts most faire & delicious, where people formerly lived onely by what they could gett by the bow & arrows. Cited from Voyages of Peter Esprit Radisson,by Peter Radisson
  • And all of them they make onely by the help of their Knives with green sticks and withs that grow in the Woods. Cited from Historical Relation Of The Island Ceylon In The East Indies, Robert Knox
  • They liue onely by feeding of cattell, and sometimes by taking of fishes. Cited from Principal Navigations, by Richard Hakluyt
  • In whom ought there to bee more love of peace, then in him, whiche onely by the warre maie be hurte? Cited from Machiavelli, Volume I, by Niccolo` Machiavelli
  • This may perhaps hint some usefull way of making other bodies, besides Silk, be susceptible of bright tinctures, but of this onely by the by. Cited from Micrographia, by Robert Hooke
  • Then being made Captaine onely by his Ladies commendations, without any worth also of his owne, he was ever after surnamd Captaine Commendations? Cited from A Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. III, by Various
  • But this coy nymph does not onely escape our hands, but our sight, and wee doe understand her onely by induction and analogic. Cited from The Natural History of Wiltshire, John Aubrey
  • He doth obiect, I am too great of birth, And that my state being gall'd with my expence, I seeke to heale it onely by his wealth. Cited from The Complete Shakespeare's First Folio
  • On the south syde are two mountaynes, the one very neere the other, distant onely by a little valley, which is the way that leadeth to the gate of Mecha. Cited from Pilgrimage to Al-Madinah & Meccah 2, R Burton
  • And whereas we can and doe put in practise sundrie actions of life, sense, motion, vnderstanding, we doe it onely by the power and vertue of the soule. Cited from The Grammar of English Grammars, by Goold Brown
  • Here are also the Aethiopians, called Ichthiopagi (that is) such as liue onely by fish, and were sometimes subdued by the warres of great Alexander. Cited from Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, Vol. 11, by Richard Hakluyt
  • I shall the lesse neede in this place, to vse many words otherwise then to conclude in this sort, That they came onely by the Northwest from England, hauing these many reasons to leade me thereunto. Cited from Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, Vol. 12, by Richard Hakluyt
  • Finding that nation of the Castors, who for the most part understands the Hurron idiom, they conversed together & weare supplied with meat by that wandring nation that lives onely by what they may or can gett. Cited from Voyages of Peter Esprit Radisson,by Peter Radisson
  • And whatsoever Lawes bind In Foro Interno, may be broken, not onely by a fact contrary to the Law but also by a fact according to it, in case a man think it contrary. Cited from Leviathan, by Thomas Hobbes
  • Whether they had knowledge of our comming or no, I can say nothing to it: Themselues giue it out that they vnderstood not of it, but onely by a Carauel the Friday at euening before we came. Cited from Principal Navigations, V7, by Richard Hakluyt
  • But (alas) the good King Edward (in respect of whom principally all this was prepared) hee onely by reason of his sickenesse was absent from this shewe, and not long after the departure of these ships, the lamentable and most sorrowfull accident of his death followed. Cited from Principal Navigations, V3, by Richard Hakluyt
  • Take your Buds before they be yellow on the top, make a brine of Vinegar and Salt, which you must do onely by shaking it together till the Salt be melted, then put in your Buds, and keepe stirred once in a day till they be sunk within the Vinegar, be sure to keep close covered. Cited from The Compleat Cook, by "W. M."
  • Secondly, that the Civill Law ceasing, Crimes cease: for there being no other Law remaining, but that of Nature, there is no place for Accusation; every man being his own Judge, and accused onely by his own Conscience, and cleared by the Uprightnesse of his own Intention. Cited from Leviathan, by Thomas Hobbes
  • For the Soveraignty over the people, which was before, not onely by vertue of the Divine Power, but also by a particular pact of the Israelites in God, and next under him, in the High Priest, as his Viceregent on earth, was cast off by the People, with the consent of God himselfe. Cited from Leviathan, by Thomas Hobbes
  • The captaine of the sayd tower and his folke did such diligence and businesse in shooting off their pieces, that the enemies durst set up no more mantellets by day, nor shoot no more but onely by night, while the Moone did shine, which is a thing worthy of memory, of maruaile, and of praise. Cited from Principal Navigations, V5, by Richard Hakluyt
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