of the crankcase

54 examples (0.04 sec)
  • This was important as it also reduced the speed of the crankcase oil seals alongside them.
  • This meant that the crankshaft could only be inserted from one end of the crankcase.
  • Engine oil was picked up from the bottom of the crankcase and slung into a reservoir at the top.
  • It had a two piece cover that enclosed most of the crankcase and gearbox.
  • Where a portion of the rotary valve is a portion of the crankcase itself, it is particularly important that no wear is allowed to take place.
  • The long-stroke engine's six cylinders and upper half of the crankcase are all in one block, like the detachable cylinder head, of cast-iron.
  • In a wet sump system, the main dipstick reaches to near the bottom of the crankcase.
  • As a result of increased revolutions, more oil mist is forced out of the crankcase and into the engine, and a feedback loop is created.
  • In a wet sump system, oil remains in a reservoir at the bottom of the crankcase, referred to as the oil pan.
  • It did however require careful sealing of the crankcase.
  • The middle part of the crankcase and the pistons were strengthened and the ignition was improved in the fifth series.
  • As forces were still transmitted between these studs and the main bearings by the walls of the crankcase, these early engines are not however considered as long-bolt engines.
  • When the vehicle is moving, airflow across the open end of the tube creates a draft that pulls gases out of the crankcase.
  • Both engines also used a scavenger pump to pump oil out of the crankcase to a separate cylinder, where a second high-pressure pump supplied oil to the engine.
  • The distributing valve forms a part of the crankcase as does the water intake, and the gear pump. Cited from Flying Machine, by W.J. Jackman & Thos. H. Russell
  • This was achieved by using bevel-gears housed in the rear of the crankcase.
  • The oil collects in an oil pan, or sump, at the bottom of the crankcase.
  • Cross-bolting has two advantages: it couples the two sides of the crankcase together, making it stiffer overall and less prone to twisting.
  • The engine mountings were designed to spread the load over the length of the crankcase to protect the expensive castings in the event of a minor shunt.
  • The reduction gear was housed under a domed casing attached to the front of the crankcase.
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