of Richard Coeur de

30 examples (0.03 sec)
  • So help me the memory of Richard Coeur-de-Lion, I have not the most distant notion of what is the matter. Cited from Crotchet Castle, by Thomas Love Peacock
  • During the absence of Richard Coeur de Lion, his English subjects not only cut their hair close, but shaved their faces. Cited from Memoirs of Popular Delusions V1, by Charles MacKay
  • The biography relates an incident in his life which is said to have taken place at the court of Richard Coeur de Lion. Cited from The Troubadours, by H.J. Chaytor
  • The stronghold of Richard Coeur-de-Lion recalls, by its situation and architecture, the castles of the Rhine. Cited from The Cross of Berny, by Emile de Girardin &c
  • The first wooden bridge was commenced when Aquitaine was governed by the English, in the reign of Richard Coeur-de-lion, at the end of the twelfth century. Cited from Jasmin: Barber, Poet, Philanthropist by Smiles
  • This lover is no ordinary suitor: he is of mingled Saxon and Norman noble blood, the recent companion-in-arms of Richard Coeur de Lion. Cited from The Experiences of a Barrister, by Samuel Warren
  • Edith was a kinswoman of Richard Coeur de Lion, and an attendant on queen Berengaria. Cited from Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama, Vol 1, by Brewer
  • The manipulation of Richard Coeur de Lion in "Ivanhoe" is instructive with this in mind. Cited from Masters of the English Novel, by Richard Burton
  • On the morning of the third day, before reaching Rouen, I saw at a distance the remains of Chateau Galliard, the favorite castle of Richard Coeur de Lion. Cited from Views a-foot, by J. Bayard Taylor
  • Every King of England from Henry I. to Henry IV., seems to have been at Wark at some time during his reign, with the exception of Richard Coeur-de-Lion and Richard II. Cited from Northumberland Yesterday and To-day, by Jean F. Terry
  • William of Saint- Pair was a subject of Henry II, King of England and Normandy; his verses, like those of Richard Coeur-de-Lion, are monuments of English literature. Cited from Mont-Saint-Michel And Chartres, Henry Adams
  • It appears that female minstrels were not uncommon, as one is mentioned in the Romance of Richard Coeur de Lion, without any remark on the strangeness of the circumstance. Cited from The Lay of Marie, by Matilda Betham
  • An effigy of Richard Coeur de Lion, lately discovered while looking for the fiery monarch's heart, which was buried in Rouen, is shown as one of the chief curiosities of the place. Cited from Notes of an Overland Journey Through France and Egypt to Bombay, Roberts
  • I remembered how Queen Eleanore had saved the life of Richard Coeur de Lion in the Holy Land, when he had been bitten by an adder, by sucking out the venom. Cited from Tramping on Life, by Harry Kemp
  • He lived during the reign of Richard Coeur de Lion, and, when the king went on his third crusade, in the year 1192, Lionel Lee raised a company of gentlemen, and marched with him to the Holy Land. Cited from A Life of Gen. Robert E. Lee, by John Esten Cooke
  • Some came from Brabant, some from Aquitaine; the Basque Marcader was one of the principal lieutenants of Richard Coeur-de-Lion. Cited from Castles and Cave Dwellings,Sabine Baring-Gould
  • It was to offset the very popular romance of Alexander, that some patriotic poet evolved the romance of Richard Coeur de Lion, explaining how this king earned his well-known nickname by wrenching the heart out of a lion! Cited from The Book of the Epic, by Helene A. Guerber
  • Instead of going out with shafts to pierce, and razors to cut, we had better imitate the friend of Richard Coeur de Lion, who, in the war of the Crusades, was captured and imprisoned, but none of his friends knew where. Cited from New Tabernacle Sermons, by Thomas De Witt Talmage
  • The history of Richard Coeur de Lion and his minstrel, Blondel, rushed, at the same time, on my mind, though I could not even then suppress a smile at the dignity of the example when applied to a blind fiddler and myself. Cited from Redgauntlet, by Sir Walter Scott
  • It is full of colour, mystery, plot, and counterplot, and Sir Kenneth's performances in withstanding the jealous enemies of Richard Coeur-de-Lion glow with life. Cited from The World's Greatest Books, V. VIII, Ed. by Arthur Mee & J.A. Hammerton
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