of censure

759 examples (0.03 sec)
  • The motion of censure may be for the whole government or any particular minister.
  • Indeed, such a son becomes on object of censure with the four principal orders. Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4
  • Go this time free, except for these words of censure; for you are not directly under my orders. Cited from When Wilderness Was King, by Randall Parrish
  • A passed motion of censure will cause the government to fall.
  • One, however, that has no wealth, never becomes the subject of censure. Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3
  • For those who proved our enemies, I have no word of censure. Cited from The Life and Adventures of Nat Love, by Nat Love
  • Scarcely has any public act of the President drawn upon his administration a greater degree of censure than this. Cited from The Life of George Washington, Vol. 5 (of 5), by John Marshall
  • After discussion the parliament may either accept the report or pass a motion of censure.
  • Only the National Assembly could vote on a motion of censure against the government.
  • Is it not really a vote of censure on the general election? Cited from Liberalism and the Social Problem, by Winston Spencer Churchill
  • I have looked upon these latter with a mixture of censure and concern. Cited from Bracebridge Hall, or The Humorists, by Washington Irving
  • He who would acquire fame must not show himself afraid of censure. Cited from Many Thoughts of Many Minds, by Various
  • He passed no word of censure on his departed friend. Cited from Hohenzollerns in America, by Stephen Leacock
  • The power to pass a vote of censure, or vote of no confidence, is limited.
  • If there be any need of censure it is to life, not to literature, that it should be given. Cited from Reviews, by Oscar Wilde
  • Our good friends who move a vote of censure upon us, are better Indians than the Indians themselves. Cited from Indian speeches (1907-1909), by John Morley (AKA Viscount Morley)
  • Of the authors of the law, it may be our duty to speak in terms of censure. Cited from Misc Writings and Speeches, Lord Macaulay V4 of 4
  • There was not a word of censure upon his course. Cited from Dewey and Other Naval Commanders, by Edward S. Ellis
  • After this, no sort of censure on their conduct, no imputation on their character. Cited from Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. V. (of 12), by Burke
  • After this, no sort of censure on their conduct; no imputation on their character! Cited from Selections, Speeches and Writings of Edmund Burke
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