no affront

31 examples (0.02 sec)
  • I am satisfied you meant no affront to my sister! Cited from The Golden Dog, by William Kirby
  • The two performers were distant enough to be no affront to each other. Cited from Somewhere in Red Gap, by Harry Leon Wilson
  • I wish it was no affront to him to make money of them, and send it to you: it would do me more good. Cited from Pamela, by Samuel Richardson
  • I know now that you meant no affront to Dian the Beautiful. Cited from At the Earth's Core, Edgar Rice Burroughs
  • I deny it; and in this I offer them no affront. Cited from Theological Essays and Other Papers v2
  • No affront, no insult, no blow could have affected Buster Jack as that sudden knowledge. Cited from The Mysterious Rider, by Zane Grey
  • Certainly there is no affront to nature in a stamp upside down. Cited from Love Conquers All, by Robert C. Benchley
  • Have you not often told me that the honour of a man consisted in receiving no affront from his own sex, and that of woman in receiving no kindness from ours? Cited from Jonathan Wild, by Henry Fielding
  • There is no affront as distressing as the tolerance of one's enemies. Cited from Nonsenseorship, by G. G. Putnam
  • I answered that we were not in a Highland wilderness, and that if no malice were meant no affront was taken. Cited from Old Friends, Epistolary Parody, by Andrew Lang
  • There was no insult, no affront, no abuse. Cited from The Memoirs of Victor Hugo, by Victor Hugo
  • There was no affront to his dignity, as the golfer had feared. Cited from The Golf Course Mystery, by Chester K. Steele
  • Fielding, therefore, while he does no affront to essential decency, does offend our taste, our refinement, in dealing with this aspect of life. Cited from Masters of the English Novel, by Richard Burton
  • The general then begged the Georgian to say to his lady that he intended no affront and that his appearing before her in his shirt was entirely owing to his presence of mind having forsaken him. Cited from Maj. Roger Sherman Potter, by F. Colburn Adams
  • He must bear no Affront without resenting it, nor refuse a Challenge, if it be sent to him in a proper Manner by a Man of Honour. Cited from An Enquiry on War, by Bernard Mandeville
  • But scholars, who know their Tacitus, will perceive what I have left out; and to those others, who are not familiar with him, the omission can be no affront. Cited from The Reign Of Tiberius, By Tacitus
  • Here, although he was received with a certain coolness, arising from his participation in the incident of the previous evening, no affront was offered him, and he had no difficulty in acquiring the information he desired. Cited from At War with Pontiac, by Kirk Munroe and J. Finnemore
  • To say the truth, he was a noble fellow; and Amelia, by supposing he had a commission in the guards, had been guilty of no affront to that honourable body. Cited from Amelia Volume I, by Henry Fielding
  • "Is it so horrible for a young girl to marry an old man, ma'am?" he asked sorrowfully, and so respectfully that she was deceived into believing that he intended no affront to her. Cited from From the Housetops, by George Barr McCutcheon
  • Was it, he asked, no affront for these three powers to tell a great country like this, that the treaty which settled the possession of all the powers of Europe, and to which it was a party, should be infringed and violated at their pleasure? Cited from History of England in Three Volumes, Vol. III, by E. Farr & E. H. Nolan
  • Next »