nesting pairs

40 examples (0.03 sec)
  • They appear to be territorial, as only one nesting pair is usually seen in an area.
  • Some of them, according to the FWS, need at least, per nesting pair.
  • Young from previous years often help nesting pairs protect a nest and feed nestlings.
  • Since at least 2008 there has also been a regular nesting pair of bald eagles.
  • There are also several hundred nesting pairs of bald eagles in this area.
  • Some seabird colonies host thousands of nesting pairs of various species.
  • Following a successful bald eagle program in the early 1990s the refuge hosts a nesting pair of eagles each winter.
  • A nesting pair may have other birds as helpers.
  • In addition, the Friends of Blackwater also offer a live that follows the adventures of a nesting pair of ospreys through the spring and summer.
  • In the 1960s the bald eagle population in the forest was only 12 nesting pairs.
  • Wildlife supported by Cushetunk Mountain includes a variety of woodland birds, including a nesting pair of bald eagles.
  • This difference was due to increased frequency of nesting pairs with increasing canopy cover, not higher reproduction by nesting pairs.
  • Abandoned burned territories have been subsumed by neighboring pairs, resulting in a decreased number of nesting pairs.
  • They will not breed till the following year although it has been found that if the ground cover surrounding the colony is cut back before these sub-adults arrive, the number of successfully nesting pairs may be increased.
  • There are now many nesting pair of eagles in the area and a healthy bear population, as well as improvements in many other avian and small mammal populations.
  • Nesting pairs of blue-throated macaws don't consistently stay at one nest for consecutive breeding seasons and will usually search for different nesting sites every year.
  • Nesting pairs of both the bald eagle and white-bellied sea eagle have been subject to live streaming web cam footage.
  • Reelfoot Lake is noted for its bald cypress trees and its nesting pairs of bald eagles.
  • Common murres breed in colonies at high densities, nesting pairs may be in bodily contact with their neighbours.
  • In more recent years, this canyon is more commonly referred to as Eagle Nest Canyon, named after a nesting pair of golden eagles observed nearby.
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