my bedstead

20 examples (0.03 sec)
  • This was not likely, and I felt that no time must be lost, as my bedstead had given the alarm. Cited from Ismailia, by Samuel W. Baker
  • One half was occupied by my bedstead, beneath which was stowed my box of clothes, while my books and writing materials were placed under the table. Cited from Himalayan Journals, V1, by J. D. Hooker
  • My bedstead was exactly opposite the partition doorway; that of my wife was on the other side of the room. Cited from Ismailia, by Samuel W. Baker
  • As dawn broke I replaced my bedstead, hiding the place where I had broken out the piece of iron with the bedclothes. Cited from The Young Llanero, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • My bedstead was formed out of an old chest, and my sole employment and amusement was idling. Cited from A Visit to the Holy Land, Egypt, and Italy, by Ida Pfeiffer
  • I do not know how long it was before I was awakened again, this time not by the noise of the storm, but by a curious movement of my bedstead. Cited from The Magic Egg and Other Stories, by Stockton
  • "Send Wachique down to bring up my bedstead." Cited from Old Kaskaskia, by Mary Hartwell Catherwood
  • Though it was calm and there was no wind, the creaking of my bedstead and the musical gurgle of the water over the rocks below were not the only sounds that reached my ears. Cited from The Empty House And Other Ghost Stories, by Algernon Blackwood
  • "And my other suits of clothes, and my bedstead, and my dewingport, and everything -- all, all gone, Miss Squires!" Cited from The Sagebrusher, by Emerson Hough
  • I disarmed all the porters, placing their lances and shields under my bedstead in the hut, lest their owners should abscond during the night. Cited from The Albert N'Yanza, Great Basin of the Nile, Baker
  • I was about to get up and light the lamp, for even the faintest candle-flame would be some sort of company at such a grewsome moment, when my bedstead gave another movement, more shiplike than before. Cited from The Magic Egg and Other Stories, by Stockton
  • Unfortunately my bedstead was the most horrible creaker, in which it was impossible to turn without producing a noise that would create an alarm, should a thief be on the alert. Cited from Ismailia, by Samuel W. Baker
  • "With one of the clamps of my bedstead; and this very tool has sufficed me to hollow out the road by which I came hither, a distance of about fifty feet." Cited from The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
  • Then a new fear came upon me and my bowels turned to water, and, running swiftly to the house of Ram Dass, I sought for my books and my money in the great wooden chest under my bedstead. Cited from Soldiers Three, by Rudyard Kipling
  • Putting up my bedstead as before, I climbed to the window, from which I noiselessly removed the bar; then getting outside, I replaced it, and dropped a height of ten feet or so into a sort of inner ditch. Cited from The Young Llanero, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • Once or twice, perhaps, in the early days I felt a certain dizziness and had to hold on for a moment to the iron rail of my bedstead, but I was too much occupied with the tender joys of motherhood to think much about myself. Cited from The Woman Thou Gavest Me, by Hall Caine
  • My bedstead, divested of its curtains, had been removed, with me upon it, into the sittingroom, as the airiest and largest, and the carpet had been taken away, and the room kept always fresh and wholesome night and day. Cited from Great Expectations, by Charles Dickens
  • "It is twenty-four hours since I spent my last fifty sous on the purchase of a rat, and I burnt the legs of my bedstead for the fuel by which that quadruped was roasted." Cited from The Parisians, by E. B. Lytton, Book 12
  • If it were not for the strong smell of red cedar and its extreme brittleness, I would have my bedstead of that material; for even the iron bedsteads, in the soldiers' barracks, become infested with them if not painted often. Cited from Canada and the Canadians, Vol. I, by Sir Richard Henry Bonnycastle
  • The hinges creaked a little, and these I hastened to oil; then closing and relocking the door softly, I crept (without pushing my bedstead back again the few inches I had wheeled it forward) to look once more upon the sleeping face of Mrs. Clayton. Cited from Sea and Shore, by Mrs. Catharine A. Warfield