much to be pitied

125 examples (0.03 sec)
  • He was not so much to be pitied as my reader may think. Cited from Sir Gibbie, by George MacDonald
  • They are a class of persons much to be pitied, for they know not what they should do. Cited from Representative Men, by Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • How it will end Heaven only knows; but she is much to be pitied. Cited from Poor Jack, by Frederick Marryat
  • And after all, are they so much to be pitied? Cited from Obiter Dicta, by Augustine Birrell
  • He is much to be pitied: he has never been the same man since Eric went. Cited from Uncle Max, by Rosa Nouchette Carey
  • Do you think we were much to be pitied? Cited from Station Life in New Zealand, by Lady Barker
  • She is very nice and kind and, above all, she's much to be pitied. Cited from War and Peace, by by Leo Tolstoy/Tolstoi
  • These water-doctors are much to be pitied, their patients must eat them out of house and home. Cited from German Classics of the 19th & 20th Centuries, Vol. VIII, Ed. by Francke
  • And whether such people ought much to be pitied? Cited from The Querist, By George Berkley
  • "From what I can learn through the papers they are certainly very much to be pitied." Cited from Ticket No. "9672", by Jules Verne [Tr.: Laura E. Kendall]
  • If there was much to be pitied there was something to be laughed at, also. Cited from Ronicky Doone, by Max Brand
  • The poor man is very much to be pitied. Cited from The Merchant of Berlin, by L Muhlbach
  • He would not be in the least to be blamed, while she would be much to be pitied. Cited from The Lost Lady of Lone, by E.D.E.N. Southworth
  • I myself was not so much to be pitied. Cited from St Ives, by Robert Louis Stevenson
  • I am not sure, after all, that young Lynde is so much to be pitied. Cited from The Queen of Sheba/My Cousin the Colonel
  • He loves him, he is so much to be pitied! Cited from Solitary of Juan Fernandez, or The Real Robinson Crusoe, by Saintine
  • Really, an Earth girl is not so much to be pitied if she has becoming dresses to wear. Cited from The Wit and Humor of America, Volume IV. (of X.), by Various
  • The state of such worthy persons is much to be pitied. Cited from A Portraiture of Quakerism, Volume III (of 3), by Thomas Clarkson
  • He explained the cause of her fainting, and asked whether she was not much to be pitied. Cited from Tales and Novels, Vol. VII, by Maria Edgeworth
  • I must admit that the poor blue velvet dress was much to be pitied. Cited from Parisian Points of View, by Ludovic Hale'vy
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