much to be deplored

28 examples (0.02 sec)
  • Nothing, she said, was so much to be deplored for a girl as a long engagement. ...
  • In either case he appears in a light in which it is much to be deplored that a Governor General should appear. ...
  • It is much to be deplored, but in some cases is perhaps inevitable. ...
  • It is much to be deplored that our sacred buildings are generally closed except at the stated periods of public resort. ...
  • Whether the companionship of such persons is very desirable, or their loss much to be deplored, each man must decide for himself. ...
  • This is much to be deplored, as peculiarities are specific in the type of several tribes both in physical appearance and in language. ...
  • The usual division of labor into forms falsely called masculine and feminine is, therefore, much to be deplored. ...
  • However much to be deplored, I fear that the foregoing opinions will be found, on most occasions of political excitement, to be true. ...
  • I know that Christian teachers have often spoken of the solemn things beyond, in tones much to be deplored, and which weaken the force of their message.
  • These two great defects, much to be deplored in an earthly bridegroom, do but make ours infinitely more lovable. ...
  • The truth is that humour as a lucrative profession is a purely modern device, and one which is much to be deplored. ...
  • We grant that it is, and a very serious one -- to a man's friends, and to all that have to do with him; but whether the condition of the man himself is so much to be deplored, may admit of a question. ...
  • She lacked courage -- a want in her case not much to be wondered at, but much to be deplored, for courage of the true sort is just as needful to the character of a woman as of a man.
  • That portion of the ground thus neglected became over-run with rank and strong weeds, which formed a great cover to the numerous rats; beside that the injury done to the soil by the growth of these weeds was very much to be deplored. ...
  • This dualism, as it was called, was the fruit of a mutual distrust, which, however much to be deplored, was not to be avoided. ...
  • This fact is much to be deplored, for when taken in excess it causes severe functional derangement of the digestive organs, and prejudicially affects the nervous system. ...
  • The abandonment of distinctive professional costume is associated with a movement of social progress, and so cannot be arrested; but it is much to be deplored in its effect upon the beauty, the keeping, and the harmonious contrast of external life. ...
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