much thunder and lightning

19 examples (0.03 sec)
  • During the night, the weather was very squally, attended with much thunder and lightning. Cited from Port Jackson and Norfolk Island, by John Hunter
  • We had scarcely housed ourselves and horses when the rain began to fall with yet more violence than before, attended with much thunder and lightning. Cited from The Bible in Spain, by George Borrow
  • We had a heavy tornado with much thunder and lightning. Cited from A Mission To The Interior of Africa, Mungo Park
  • The weather during the latter end of January and the month of February was very close, with rain, at times very heavy, and attended with much thunder and lightning. Cited from Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, Vol. 1, David Collins
  • I think we ran 16 leagues that day, as we had all night a stiff gale, with much thunder and lightning. Cited from Voyages and Travels, Vol. VII, by Robert Kerr
  • The wind however continued freshening rapidly, and during the evening and night we had heavy squalls accompanied by rain from all quarters, and much thunder and lightning. Cited from Expeditions in North-West and Western Australia, Vol. 1, by George Grey
  • There fell abundance of Snow and Rain in the Night, with much Thunder and Lightning. Cited from A New Voyage to Carolina, by John Lawson
  • Along the equatorial limit of the southeast trade winds the air was heavily charged with electricity, and there was much thunder and lightning. Cited from Sailing Alone Around The World, by Joshua Slocum
  • On the 17th and 18th there were frequent showers of rain and much thunder and lightning. Cited from The Journey to the Polar Sea, by John Franklin
  • Heavy storms gathered to seawards with much thunder and lightning, but no rain fell near us; the sea appearing to attract all the showers. Cited from Expeditions into Central Australia, by E. J. Eyre
  • One would suppose that after so much thunder and lightning the air would be more pure and cool, but nothing of the kind was apparent, nothing but intense heat, prostrating all the animals. Cited from McKinlay's Journal of Exploration. . .Australia, by John McKinlay
  • The 11th July, we again passed the equator, where we were becalmed, with excessive heat, and much thunder and lightning. Cited from Voyages and Travels, Vol. VIII, by Robert Kerr
  • There was much thunder and lightning, with some crashing in the woods close at hand, that caused both Baxter and Dick to start in alarm. Cited from The Rover Boys in Camp, by Arthur M. Winfield
  • The night was tempestuous, with much thunder and lightning, but about two in the morning the weather cleared; the gusts settled into a little breeze, and the moon shone very bright. Cited from Voyages and Travels, Vol. 12, by Robert Kerr
  • The other, or westerly, is called the bad monsoon, consisting of blustering rainy weather, accompanied with much thunder and lightning, especially in December, January, and February. Cited from History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. X, by Robert Kerr
  • All night the gale blew on, accompanied with much thunder and lightning, and it was not till noon of the 9th that I descried my palkee-boat toiling down the stream. Cited from Himalayan Journals, V1, by J. D. Hooker
  • In the last week of this month the weather was very unsettled and squally, with much thunder and lightning, and rain, the wind mostly between South-East and North-East; after which, the westerly breezes set in again, and continued until we left the coast in the middle of December. Cited from Discoveries in Australia, Volume 2, by John Lort Stokes
  • By eight o'clock we steered a South-West course, and passed the islands of Savu and Benjoar; the breeze then freshening veered round to the eastward and brought on heavy rain with much thunder and lightning. Cited from Survey of the Intertropical and Western Coasts of Australia, V1, by King
  • These winds are accompanied by much thunder and lightning, and excessive rains, of so noisome a nature, as immediately to cause people's clothes to stink on their backs; and wherever this rain-water stagnates, even for a short space of time, it brings forth many offensive animalcules. Cited from General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume IX, Kerr