Mr Crank

20 examples (0.03 sec)
  • Two evenings afterwards we went to a party at the house of Mr Crank. Cited from The Two Supercargoes, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • As I turned my head slightly, I could see both Mr Crank and Harry. Cited from The Two Supercargoes, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • The difference between Mr Crank and Harry was indeed most conspicuous in their personal appearance. Cited from The Two Supercargoes, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • As soon as I received their letter I placed it in the hands of Mr Crank, who seemed well pleased. Cited from The Two Supercargoes, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • Occasionally we went out to Mr Crank's parties and those of other friends, so that our lives were in no respects dull. Cited from The Two Supercargoes, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • Occasionally we went out to Mr Crank's parties and those of other friends, so that our lives were in no respects dull. Cited from The Two Supercargoes, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • I found also that he very frequently called at Mr Crank's residence at times when he well knew that the old gentleman would be at his counting-house. Cited from The Two Supercargoes, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • I found also that he very frequently called at Mr Crank's residence at times when he well knew that the old gentleman would be at his counting-house. Cited from The Two Supercargoes, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • As Mr Crank was out, Mr Trunnion desired him to come in and give an account of his voyage. Cited from The Two Supercargoes, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • I therefore, whenever Harry went out, made some excuse for accompanying him, especially when he went to Mr Crank's house. Cited from The Two Supercargoes, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • I therefore, whenever Harry went out, made some excuse for accompanying him, especially when he went to Mr Crank's house. Cited from The Two Supercargoes, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • The second time, when he stopped before Mr Crank's house, the light of the moon falling on his face revealed his features to me, and convinced me that I was not mistaken. Cited from The Two Supercargoes, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • The second time, when he stopped before Mr Crank's house, the light of the moon falling on his face revealed his features to me, and convinced me that I was not mistaken. Cited from The Two Supercargoes, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • By the way Mr Crank and Lucy received him, I felt convinced that Mr Trunnion had said nothing to prejudice the senior partner against him. Cited from The Two Supercargoes, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • I should have said I had made all the inquiries I could for Captain Roderick, but could hear nothing of him, nor did he ever come near Mr Crank's house after he knew I saw him waiting at the door. Cited from The Two Supercargoes, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • I should have said I had made all the inquiries I could for Captain Roderick, but could hear nothing of him, nor did he ever come near Mr Crank's house after he knew I saw him waiting at the door. Cited from The Two Supercargoes, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • What surprised me was that Mr Trunnion should not have spoken to Mr Crank, or that the latter should not have thought it strange that Captain Roderick never came to the counting-house. Cited from The Two Supercargoes, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • He was raised from grade to grade until he became head clerk, and during the illness of Mr Crank and the absence of Mr Trunnion, he so well managed the affairs of the firm, that they felt bound to offer him a partnership in the business, to the success of which he had so greatly contributed. Cited from The Two Supercargoes, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • The fact was, that he had got into the good graces of Miss Deborah Crank, Mr Crank's maiden sister, who resided with him to look after Miss Lucy and keep his house in order. Cited from The Two Supercargoes, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • The fact was, that he had got into the good graces of Miss Deborah Crank, Mr Crank's maiden sister, who resided with him to look after Miss Lucy and keep his house in order. Cited from The Two Supercargoes, by W.H.G. Kingston