most perishable

24 examples (0.04 sec)
  • It uses up the finest and most perishable parts of a woman's nature. Cited from Superseded, by May Sinclair
  • "We must use the most perishable first and keep the best preserved for our voyage." Cited from The Three Admirals, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • But of all the productions of land, milk is perhaps the most perishable. Cited from Wealth of Nations, by Adam Smith
  • BERRIES are among the most perishable fruits and begin to come into market early in the summer season. Cited from Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 5
  • Those which contain the highest percentage of water are the most perishable. Cited from Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 5
  • And twice alas, that the beautiful should ever be the most perishable! Cited from The Prince of India, by Lew. Wallace, Vol. 1
  • She was wearing white chiffon the last time we dined here -- a most perishable material. Cited from Mary Gray, by Katharine Tynan
  • A flower is a completed idea, a thought of God, a creature whose body is most perishable, bat whose soul, its idea, cannot die. Cited from What's Mine's Mine V2, by George MacDonald
  • As a result most perishable items, particularly frozen meats, will surely be wasted after the storm.
  • In this way, matter incapable of putrefaction takes the places of that portion in the meat which is most perishable. Cited from The Book of Household Management, by Mrs. Isabella Beeton
  • After warming ourselves, we opened a passage through the snow for a short distance, and clearing another spot led our horses into this most perishable of stables. Cited from The Great Salt Lake Trail, by Colonel Henry Inman
  • The most enduring rocks are the oldest; and the most perishable are, as a rule, the youngest. Cited from Time and Change, by John Burroughs
  • One, which is human, prompts me to cultivate my happiness, but the other teaches me that human happiness is a most perishable flower. Cited from Letters of a Soldier, 1914-1915, by Anonymous
  • Upon this minority depends our power of profiting by the finest human experience of the past; they keep alive the subtlest and most perishable parts of tradition.
  • For certainly were it not for the bright look-out kept over him by some sort of maritime angel, the mariner would rank foremost as amongst the most perishable of human products. Cited from The Honour of the Flag, by W. Clark Russell
  • Forthwith I set out breakfast, choosing such things as I judged the most perishable, and we ate and drank mighty cheerful. Cited from Martin Conisby's Vengeance, by Jeffery Farnol
  • Memory is the most sacred, but also the most perishable of shrines; hence it sometimes seems well worth while to break through reticence to give greater permanence to precious recollections. Cited from Lady John Russell, by Desmond MacCarthy and Agatha Russell
  • Since most perishable items were going to spoil anyway, many restaurants and citizens simply prepared what they could and served it to anyone who wanted it, leading to vast block parties in many New York City neighborhoods.
  • Of all sway, that of the orator is the most potent and most perishable; and the student and the artist are apt to hold themselves aloof from it, for this reason. Cited from Women and the Alphabet, by Thomas Wentworth Higginson
  • The progress in painting was not so much an imitation of classical models as was the case with sculpture and architecture, for the reason that painting, being one of the most perishable of the arts, had preserved few of its ancient Greek or Roman examples. Cited from Modern Europe V.1, by Carlton J. H. Hayes
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