more perishable

41 examples (0.03 sec)
  • But the spoken word is more perishable than the written, and little has survived.
  • There is no possession more perishable, more delicate, than the human voice. Cited from For Every Music Lover, by Aubertine Woodward Moore
  • They are supposed, however, to have been generally formed of more perishable materials, of wood or straw. Cited from History Of The Conquest Of Peru, by Wm H. Prescott
  • Years had changed the more perishable features of the scene; but rock and iron yield slowly to the influence of time. Cited from Tales of a Traveller, by Washington Irving
  • Nothing is more perishable than works of this description. Cited from Manual Of Egyptian Archaeology, by Gaston Camille Charles Maspero
  • Could it be that God's highest creation was a more perishable thing than the lifeless work of its own hand? Cited from The Dreamer, by Mary Newton Stanard
  • The greater part of goods, besides, are more perishable than money, and he may frequently sustain a much greater loss by keeping them. Cited from Wealth of Nations, by Adam Smith
  • His political institutions, however cunningly devised, have always been yet more perishable than his structures of stone and marble. Cited from A Voyage to the Moon, by George Tucker (AKA Joseph Atterley)
  • This may be because other possibly traded goods (such as textiles) were more perishable in nature.
  • But in the market-place there are exposed for sale the more perishable things of Moorish living. Cited from Life in Morocco and Glimpses Beyond, by Budgett Meakin
  • Raspberries should be treated with even greater care than strawberries, since they are softer and more perishable. Cited from Success With Small Fruits, by E. P. Roe
  • For there are other monuments, far more enduring than these, remaining tens of thousands of years after the more perishable records are lost. Cited from Steep Trails, by John Muir
  • It is therefore thought likely that they were represented in other more perishable forms that have not survived in the archaeological record, perhaps including clothing and tattoos.
  • Curious, isn't it, when one comes to think of it, that the riper civilization has grown, the more perishable its records have become? Cited from Equality, by Edward Bellamy
  • Two showed traces of tongue and eyes (which often were blue), proving that the softer and more perishable parts were not removed. Cited from To the Gold Coast for Gold, v1, Burton & Cameron
  • In 1515 the Florentine artists were employed on more perishable works than frescoes. Cited from Fra Bartolommeo, by Leader Scott
  • Zulu Architecture was constructed with more perishable materials.
  • This last circumstance may induce men of letters to prefer this miscellany to more perishable publications as the vehicle of their effusions. Cited from Reminiscences of Coleridge and Southey, J. Cottle
  • They may have replaced fibulae made of more perishable Neolithic materials, such as bone to as late as 800 AD.
  • I have also been reading Carlyle's Cromwell: which I think will last also, and so carry along with it many of his more perishable tirades. Cited from Letters of Edward FitzGerald in Two Volumes, V. 2, by Edward FitzGerald
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