more matronly

19 examples (0.02 sec)
  • She was just a little more matronly, perhaps, but without doubt a most beautiful woman. Cited from Peter Ruff and the Double Four, by Oppenheim
  • Of course, we have spoken only of young ladies, a more matronly style being expected from their chaperons. Cited from Godey's Lady's Book, Vol. 42, January, 1851, by Various
  • Here it has a maturer and more matronly look, but with no less sweetness. Cited from Correggio, by Estelle M. Hurll
  • A little more matronly, perhaps, and not quite as much of a girl as when you first made her acquaintance; but Martha, nevertheless. Cited from The Crater, by James Fenimore Cooper
  • Recha had become stouter and more matronly, but one would scarcely take her for the mother of the blooming girl by her side. Cited from Rabbi and Priest, by Milton Goldsmith
  • She was taller, Harold perceived, and more matronly in all ways. Cited from The Eagle's Heart, by Hamlin Garland
  • Saxon was genuinely shocked when some of them, even the more matronly, danced hulas on the sand. Cited from The Valley of the Moon, by Jack London
  • While ascending I racked my brain to determine what peculiarity of manner we could adopt that would give us a more matronly air while traveling, but I could think of nothing. Cited from Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 27, June, 1873, by Various
  • The widow herself was graver and more matronly, yet there was much of the old Isabella left, and Verdayne was glad to see her. Cited from One Day, by Anonymous
  • They were mothers, and a little more matronly in appearance, but none the less lovely; their children, like themselves, were objects of great interest, in their respective families, and happy indeed were the households which received them. Cited from The Crater, by James Fenimore Cooper
  • The mild blue eyes of Clara met those that were fastened in tenderness upon her, and a corresponding movement on her part brought the more matronly form of her cousin into close and affectionate contact with her own. Cited from Wacousta, by John Richardson (Complete)
  • To him, Mary had only grown more matronly, and, wisely laying aside the frivolity of girlhood, had acquired the sedateness of riper years. Cited from The Wedding Guest, by T.S. Arthur
  • She was probably three years older than Vivie and likewise a well-favoured woman, a little more matronly in appearance, somewhat after the style of a married actress who really loves her husband and has preserved her own looks wonderfully, though no one would take her for less than twenty-eight. Cited from Mrs. Warren's Daughter, by Sir Harry Johnston
  • She presented her more matronly companion to them, by the name of Donna Lorenza; and as nothing but good feeling prevailed, and useless ceremony was banished, the little party were soon on terms of friendly intercourse. Cited from Precaution, by James Fenimore Cooper
  • It was not fear for the security of his prisoner which troubled him, but the unseemliness of the young woman's persistence in remaining to this hour under an espionage no more matronly than that of a sketch-book abandoned on the table when we had come out to the open. Cited from The Guest of Quesnay, by Booth Tarkington
  • Lotty Starr (that was the name of the elder child, and it became her much better than any more matronly appellation), would not remain silent, in spite of the efforts it cost her to speak, and her conversation ran on the most trivial topics. Cited from The Unclassed, by George Gissing
  • Cecil could see two before different house-doors as she sat behind her muslin curtains, looking as fresh and healthful as ever, and scarcely more matronly, except that her air of self-assertion had become more easy and less aggressive now that she was undisputed mistress of the house in London. Cited from The Three Brides, by Charlotte M. Yonge
  • Though unmarried, she was addressed as Mrs., not Miss, More; and she seems to have insisted on this, which I think was a weakness, since the dignity of her character, her fame and high social position, needed no conventional crutch to make her appear more matronly. Cited from Beacon Lights of History, Volume VII, by John Lord
  • The first I did not know; but I soon, to my infinite satisfaction, recognised in the other my old and charming playmate -- once Ellen Barrow, now Mrs Northcote -- not less charming, but more matronly than before. Cited from Mark Seaworth, by William H.G. Kingston