more afflicting

29 examples (0.02 sec)
  • Is the fear of an end more afflicting, than that of having had a beginning! Cited from Good Sense, by Baron D'Holbach
  • If my heart could have been broken, it would have been so years ago, and by events more afflicting than these. Cited from Life of Lord Byron, With His Letters and Journals, Vol. 3, ed. by Moore
  • But he had turned his eyes away, and the sound of her voice was even more afflicting than the sight of her face. Cited from The Christian, by Hall Caine
  • The missing of an opera the first night would be more afflicting to her than the death of a child. Cited from Essays and Tales, by Joseph Addison
  • And what is there thou canst do that would be more afflicting to them that wish thee well? Cited from Colloquies of Erasmus, Vol. I, by Erasmus, Ed. by Rev. E. Johnson
  • The fear of ceasing to exist, is it more afflicting than the thought of having not always been? Cited from Superstition In All Ages (1732), by Jean Meslier
  • I have never read anything more afflicting and more stupid. Cited from The Philosophy of Misery, by P. J. Proudhon
  • The additional procrastination which this new journey will create, cannot be more afflicting to you than it is to me. Cited from Italian Letters, Vols. I and II,William Godwin
  • Is it more afflicting to him to leave the graves of his fathers than it is to our brothers and children? Cited from Messages and Papers of the Presidents: Andrew Jackson, by Richardson
  • The missing of an Opera the first Night, would be more afflicting to her than the Death of a Child. Cited from The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3, by Joseph Addison and Richard Steele
  • Sure there can be nothing more afflicting than to think it had been happier for his Son to have been born of any other Man living than himself. Cited from The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3, by Joseph Addison and Richard Steele
  • The brother and sister of his false favourite had no such relief; everything in their history, past and present, gave his delinquency a more afflicting meaning to them. Cited from Dombey and Son, by Charles Dickens
  • Amidst this life no calamity is more afflicting than that, whether fortunate or not, the mind is equally disquieted. Cited from Persian Literature, V2, The Shah Nameh, Rubaiyat, Divan, Gulistan
  • "Was there ever a more afflicting calamity!" she writes. Cited from What I Remember, Volume 2, by Thomas Adolphus Trollope
  • I cried out in agony; beat my head and breast, and threw myself upon the ground, where I lay some time in despair, one afflicting thought being succeeded by another still more afflicting. Cited from The Arabian Nights Entertainments vol. 1, Anon
  • And hardly more afflicting was this disabled return from the battle, than the sight of the continually pouring forth ready-armed and vigorous victims that marched past my windows to meet similar destruction. Cited from The Diary and Letters of Madam D'Arblay Volume 3
  • The cheerfulness of her entrance upon womanhood, had been darkened, by an attendance upon the death-bed of her mother, and the still more afflicting calamity of her eldest sister. Cited from Memoirs of the Author of a Vindication of the Rights of Woman, by Godwin
  • But there is something even more afflicting in the people who drop all decent pretence of dignity, and pour the product of an acrid and disappointed spirit into all conversations. Cited from Where No Fear Was,by Arthur Christopher Benson
  • The happier the state of marriage, the more afflicting is the widowhood; besides, we may try a friend and reject him after trial; butwe cannot know a wife till it is too late to part with her. Cited from Fletcher of Madeley, by Brigadier Margaret Allen
  • Is there anything more afflicting than to see public and individual welfare depend upon a futile science, which is void of principles, which has no standing ground but imagination, and which presents to the mind but words void of sense? Cited from Superstition In All Ages (1732), by Jean Meslier
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