might be convenient

34 examples (0.03 sec)
  • It might look a little further than might be convenient. Cited from Our American Cousin, by Tom Taylor
  • The relation of homage could be made to mean anything or nothing, as might be convenient. Cited from William the Conqueror, by E.A. Freeman
  • He smiled and looked foolish, and declared that he only offered his assistance because perhaps it might be convenient at the present moment. Cited from The Claverings, by Anthony Trollope
  • Indeed, there was a tacit agreement between the two young men that they would see as little of each other as might be convenient. Cited from Dawn, by H. Rider Haggard
  • On the contrary, she would continue to enjoy the same access to the British market while giving her own industries such protection as might be convenient. Cited from Against Home Rule (1912), by Various
  • Because a thing might be convenient, it did not, according to the dictates of her moral sense, follow that it was lawful. Cited from Mr. Meeson's Will, by H. Rider Haggard
  • He had intimated to the seignior what land might be convenient for the location of a convent. Cited from Chase Of Saint-Castin And Other Stories, by Mary Hartwell Catherwood
  • For its own sake, Roland was hurrying to get to it, as well as that it might be convenient to do so. Cited from The Channings: A Story, by Mrs. Henry Wood
  • Newton went to the pond, because he said he was going out for that purpose, and it might be convenient to be able to swear that he had really been down to the water's edge. Cited from The Little City Of Hope, by F. Marion Crawford
  • The possession of Genoa might have proved a troublesome bone of contention, which it might be convenient to lose by accident. Cited from Travels through France & Italy, by Tobias Smollett
  • Major Burr suggested his suspicions to General Putnam, and recommended that she be conveyed to her friends as soon as might be convenient. Cited from Memoirs of Aaron Burr, Complete, Matthew L. Davis
  • In this way it was possible so to time the effect as to throw their brief anodyne relief upon the dinner-hour or any other time when it might be convenient to have the agony of the struggle a little alleviated. Cited from The Opium Habit, by Horace B. Day
  • A small bay was observed on the north-west side of the island, which might be convenient for boats; and from the steep declivity of the land round it, there seemed a probability that fresh water might be procured at this season. Cited from A Voyage to Terra Australis Volume 2, by Matthew Flinders
  • Arrived there, he wrote a little note to a friend of his who was a doctor and lived in the rue Notre Dame des Champs, asking this man to call as soon as it might be convenient. Cited from Jason, by Justus Miles Forman
  • Then Mrs. Evelyn (by way of doing anything for her friend) undertook to make Elvira welcome as long as it might be convenient, and was warmly thanked. Cited from Magnum Bonum, by Charlotte M. Yonge
  • He certainly had been allured into making an offer to Dorothy Stanbury, but was ready to atone for this crime by marrying her daughter Camilla as soon as might be convenient. Cited from He Knew He Was Right, by Anthony Trollope
  • The barn was built in such a manner that its deposits might be convenient to the road which divides the farm, while the sty was made an attachment of the house for convenience in feeding its occupants. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 2, No. 10, August, 1858, by Various
  • At one time Clive had almost made up his mind to discard this phantom altogether; but he afterwards thought that it might be convenient still to use the name of the Nabob, particularly in dealings with other European nations. Cited from Critical and Historical Essays, by Macaulay V1
  • The Mangeysterne hounds wanted that great ingredient of prosperity, a large nest-egg subscriber, to whom all others could be tributary -- paying or not as might be convenient. Cited from Mr. Sponge's Sporting Tour, by R. S. Surtees
  • Early in the day General Mohun received a note from Clement Underwood, begging him to look in at St. Andrew's Rock as soon as might be convenient. Cited from The Long Vacation, by Charlotte M. Yonge
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