merge sort

84 examples (0.03 sec)
  • It can sort using just three sequential files rather than the four required by merge sort.
  • After repeating these steps for every level of the bottom-up merge sort, the block sort is completed.
  • After repeating these steps for every level of the bottom-up merge sort, the block sort is completed.
  • Like the standard merge sort, in-place merge sort is also a stable sort.
  • In the bottom up merge sort, the starting point assumes each run is one item long.
  • In the bottom up merge sort, the starting point assumes each run is one item long.
  • Next it must extract two internal buffers for each level of the merge sort.
  • Like merge sort, external distribution sort also has a main-memory sibling; see bucket sort.
  • For example, consider a bottom-up merge sort.
  • For example, consider a bottom-up merge sort.
  • In the extreme case, this variant works similar to merge sort.
  • As previously stated, the outer loop of a block sort is identical to a bottom-up merge sort.
  • As previously stated, the outer loop of a block sort is identical to a bottom-up merge sort.
  • In this situation it would be identical to a merge sort.
  • If the four files were on four separate tape drives, watching an ordinary merge sort would show some interesting details.
  • In the typical case, the natural merge sort may not need as many passes because there are fewer runs to merge.
  • Merge sort parallelizes well due to use of the divide-and-conquer method.
  • An iteration (or pass) in ordinary merge sort involves reading and writing the entire file.
  • Typically, a merge sort splits items into sorted runs and then recursively merges each run into larger runs.
  • On the other hand, merge sort is a stable sort and is more efficient at handling slow-to-access sequential media.
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