may retard

29 examples (0.03 sec)
  • Who is it answers what is birth Or death, that nothing may retard? Cited from Poems, by Madison Cawein
  • We may hasten or we may retard, but we can not prevent the final reconciliation. Cited from Phrases for Public Speakers and Paragraphs for Study, by Kleiser
  • We may hasten or we may retard, but we can not prevent, the final reconciliation. Cited from Messages and Papers of the Presidents: Garfield, Ed. by Richardson
  • "If you do not you may retard justice." Cited from The Red Seal, by Natalie Sumner Lincoln
  • After ordinary care is taken, too minute attention to the digestive apparatus, for example, may retard rather than aid it. Cited from Why Worry?, by George Lincoln Walton, M.D.
  • With intelligent, persistent effort they may retard further change considerably, but that is the most that they can hope to do. Cited from The Flying U's Last Stand, by B. M. Bower
  • This decline is due to the operation of a natural law which diplomacy may retard but cannot hinder. Cited from The Inside Story Of The Peace Conference, by Emile Joseph Dillon
  • "Perhaps you are right, Amine; I may retard, but cannot escape, whatever may be my intended fate." Cited from The Phantom Ship, by Captain Frederick Marryat
  • You may hasten the change; you may retard it; you can no more prevent it than you can prevent the coming of the sunrise on the morrow. Cited from The Debs Decision, by Scott Nearing
  • Obstacles may retard, but they cannot long prevent the progress of a movement sanctified in justice and sustained by a virtuous people. Cited from The Guns of Bull Run, by Joseph A. Altsheler
  • The inhabitants of the United States may retard the calamities which they apprehend, but they cannot now destroy their efficient cause. Cited from American Institutions, by Alexis de Tocqueville
  • Obstacles may retard, but they cannot long prevent, the progress of a movement sanctioned by its justice and sustained by a virtuous people. Cited from American Eloquence, Volume IV (of 4), by Various
  • Obstacles may retard, but they can not long prevent, the progress of a movement sanctified by its justice and sustained by a virtuous people. Cited from The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, by Jefferson Davis
  • A person may also take false measures for the attaining his end, and may retard, by his foolish conduct, instead of forwarding the execution of any project. Cited from A Treatise of Human Nature V1&2, by David Hume
  • This railway is, however, embarrassed by certain financial difficulties, which may retard for a time the completion of the gigantic undertaking. Cited from Englishwoman in America, by I. Lucy Bird
  • In the first case the destruction of the system will be very slow, in the second case it will be more rapid, but there may be a tendency towards arrangement in narrow rings which may retard the process. Cited from A History of Science, V 3, by Henry Smith Williams
  • Although the proposed treaty did not arrest the progress of military preparation, it is doubtful how far the advance of the season, before good faith justified active movements, may retard them during the remainder of the year. Cited from Messages and Papers of the Presidents: George Washington, by Richardson
  • Their vitality is amazing; persecution with scythe and plow may retard, but never check their victorious march. Cited from Wild Flowers, by Neltje Blanchan
  • Nevertheless an insufficient supply of the "C" vitamine may retard growth and well being in the individual without manifesting itself in its more acute form of scurvy. Cited from The Vitamine Manual, by Walter H. Eddy
  • There is one great and moving order of events which we may retard, but we cannot arrest, and to which, if we endeavour to hasten them, we only give a dangerous and unnatural impetus. Cited from Falkland, by E. B. Lytton, Book 1
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