lost asteroid

20 examples (0.05 sec)
  • This asteroid was observed for 2 months and then with time became a lost asteroid.
  • The project has also rediscovered 719 Albert, a long-lost asteroid.
  • A very small selection of lost asteroids with provisional designations.
  • In other words, it was a lost asteroid from 1960 until it was recovered in 2007.
  • This is really just a small selection of early lost asteroids that were recovered, with some additional examples because the true number of lost asteroids by some definitions is over 150000.
  • Some lost asteroids turn out to be erroneous observations, as in the case of 330 Adalberta.
  • The lost asteroid was rediscovered as and determined to be a small ~1 km asteroid in the asteroid belt.
  • This asteroid was lost after its initial discovery (a lost asteroid) and was reidentified in 1986 by Syuichi Nakano.
  • It was discovered by Max Wolf on February 13, 1901, but only observed for 1 month so it became a "lost asteroid" for many decades.
  • At the time of its rediscovery, Albert was the last remaining "lost asteroid" among those assigned numbers (69230 Hermes was not numbered until 2003).
  • With an original observation arc of only 22 days, 132 Aethra was a lost asteroid between 1873 and 1922.
  • Lost comets can be compared to lost asteroids, although calculation of cometary orbits differs because of nongravitational forces that can affect comets, such as emission of jets of gas from the nucleus.
  • When it was recovered in 2000, Albert was the last "lost asteroid" among those assigned numbers (69230 Hermes was not numbered until 2003).
  • It was named for the country in which it was discovered; however, its name and number were actually taken from another asteroid that was considered a lost asteroid at the time, but was eventually recovered and given the new designation 3789 Zhongguo (1928 UF).
  • It was a lost asteroid for 65 years before being rediscovered by Heidelberg Astronomisches Rechen-Institut in 1981.
  • In extreme cases, such as "lost" asteroids, there may be a considerable mismatch: for instance the high-numbered 69230 Hermes was originally discovered in 1937, but it was a lost asteroid until 2003.
  • Working on the LONEOS project he rediscovered the long lost asteroid 69230 Hermes in October 2003 and the Apohele asteroid in May 2004.
  • In the close approach of February 1936 that led to its initial discovery, the asteroid was observed for two months, but not enough observations could be made to calculate an orbit, and Adonis was a lost asteroid until 1977 when it was rediscovered by Charles T. Kowal.
  • It became a lost asteroid until it was recovered in 1982 from exposures on the 48-inch (120 cm) Schmidt at Palomar Observatory.
  • It was discovered to be a lost asteroid which had previously been observed twice: at the Brera-Merate Observatory in northern Italy on 12 December 1973 and at Siding Spring Observatory (Australia) on 8 and 9 July 1990.