listlessly watching

23 examples (0.03 sec)
  • Later her highness stood before one of the long windows in the conservatory, listlessly watching the people in the square. Cited from The Goose Girl, by Harold MacGrath
  • She rested against him, her eyes listlessly watching the people swiftly gathering in the dazzling light. Cited from The Common Law, by Robert W. Chambers
  • Then, still curiously eyeing Hester, he came back, followed by his dog, to the place where she stood, listlessly watching. Cited from The Case of Richard Meynell, by Mrs. Humphry Ward
  • While listlessly watching the passersby a touch of homesickness almost got the mastery of him. Cited from The Trail of the Tramp, by A-No. 1 (AKA Leon Ray Livingston)
  • With his stick, a very ordinary bit of oak, he kept knocking pebbles into the water, and listlessly watching them splash. Cited from Thomas Wingfold, Curate, by George MacDonald
  • She found him leaning against the window in the failing light, listlessly watching the horses and grooms in the mews, which his high window overlooked. Cited from The Two Guardians, by Charlotte Mary Yonge
  • Hamil, who, chair pushed back, had been listlessly watching the orchestra, roused himself and turned to his aunt and Wayward. Cited from The Firing Line, by Robert W. Chambers
  • But she could not stay there, and must needs wander restlessly about the gardens, plucking flowers and listlessly watching the gardeners at their work. Cited from The Half-Hearted, by John Buchan
  • I had left the door open, and I remember listlessly watching the wind making a target of my candle, but never taking a sufficiently big breath to do more than frighten it. Cited from The Little Minister, by J.M. Barrie
  • She sat listlessly watching the dusk-moths hovering among the pinks. Cited from The Danger Mark, by Robert W. Chambers
  • Excitement spread like fire from stern to bow, until even Helga of the Broken Heart arose from her cushions on the fore-deck and stood listlessly watching the approach. Cited from Thrall Of Leif The Lucky, Ottilie A. Liljencrantz
  • The chair-girl, who sewed beautifully, was fixing over one of Mary Louise's black dresses while Mary Louise sat opposite, listlessly watching her. Cited from Mary Louise, by Edith van Dyne
  • Some of them are occupied in listlessly watching the movements of the birds in the aviaries; others hold a languid and whispered conversation with such of the courtiers as happen to be placed near them. Cited from Antonina, by Wilkie Collins
  • It was not until Sunday evening, as he lay listlessly watching his scanty allowance of daylight grow dimmer, that he became sure of the hand that he had detected in the workmanship of the piece. Cited from The Mystery of Metropolisville, by Edward Eggleston
  • For a moment she seemed to be listlessly watching the white, shapeless things, trembling as with life, and creeping silently into wood and up glen; and then her lashes drooped wearily together. Cited from A Mountain Europa, by John Fox, Jr.
  • The evening of the assassination she was in this same room, lying on this same bed, before this same window, and after having read all day, she reflected and dreamed about her book, while listlessly watching the coming of twilight in the court, that already obscured everything in its shadow. Cited from Conscience by Hector Malot, v2
  • It was Winston's last afternoon at the Grange, and almost unpleasantly hot, while the man whose vigor had not as yet returned to him was content to lounge in the big window-seat listlessly watching his companion. Cited from Winston of the Prairie, by Harold Bindloss
  • The mountaineer sat looking closely at Easter, who was listlessly watching the moon as it rose above the Cumberland Range and brought into view the wavering outline of Pine Mountain and the shadowed valley below. Cited from A Mountain Europa, by John Fox, Jr.
  • Directly they entered the village, each goat trotted off to its own abode, and Stephan to his, where, after eating his supper of black bread and cheese, he sat listlessly watching his mother varnish violins, by which she earned a trifle every week. Cited from St. Nicholas Magazine for Boys and Girls, Vol. 5, Oct 1878, No. 12
  • Half-past four of a delightful June afternoon, and two young ladies sit at two large, lace-draped windows, overlooking a fashionable Mayfair street, alternately glancing over the books they hold, and listlessly watching the passers-by. Cited from A Terrible Secret, by May Agnes Fleming
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