less equivocal

29 examples (0.02 sec)
  • The language held in this assembly was much stronger and less equivocal than that formerly used. Cited from Holland, by Thomas Colley Grattan
  • Rousseau, however, had good sense enough in less equivocal forms than this. Cited from Rousseau, Volumes 1 and 2, by John Morley
  • Other symptoms of a less equivocal description, soon placed the character of my illness beyond a doubt. Cited from Jack in the Forecastle, by John Sherburne Sleeper
  • Their position soon became less equivocal and more aggressive, by the addition of those members elected in the year V. Cited from History of the French Revolution, by F.A.M Mignet
  • He described those alarms in this manner, although the cause of them was then grown far less equivocal and far more urgent. Cited from Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. V. (of 12), by Burke
  • Traces of the native inhabitants, however, are much less equivocal. Cited from The Project Gutenberg Encyclopedia Volume 1 of 28
  • In his poetry this animus took a less equivocal shape. Cited from Robert Browning, by C. H. Herford
  • The position in which he uttered it, his countenance when she turned to answer him, were both demonstrative of something less equivocal than his speech. Cited from Thaddeus of Warsaw, by Jane Porter
  • She knew that he had done some wicked thing, and that all his life was a maze of more or less equivocal stratagems. Cited from Leonora, by Arnold Bennett
  • If they had, they would have given a less equivocal position to Priapus in their celestial hierarchy. Cited from South Wind, by Norman Douglas
  • If science could do this it would confer upon humanity an advantage far less equivocal than that which belongs to the present reign of iron and steam. Cited from Problems of Poverty, by John A. Hobson
  • He awoke, with a mortifying discovery that the crash had been of a somewhat less equivocal nature. Cited from Traditions of Lancashire, Volume 1 (of 2), by John Roby
  • A much less equivocal case is supplied by Hippolytus -- less equivocal at least so far as the reference goes. Cited from The Gospels in the Second Century, by William Sanday
  • On his side the inclination was stronger, on hers less equivocal. Cited from Mansfield Park, by Jane Austen
  • Is it not probable, on the whole, that he has had a greater and less equivocal influence on human happiness than Shakespeare with all his plays and sonnets? Cited from The Life of Reason, by George Santayana
  • Then he rose to his feet, nodded, dusted his trousers, and Mr. Carlyle moved to a less equivocal position. Cited from Four Max Carrados Detective Stories, by Ernest Bramah
  • No other change was made by his appearance, than a renewal of the threatening gestures, with, if possible, a still less equivocal display of their remorseless intentions. Cited from The Prairie, by J Fenimore Cooper
  • Alida made no effort to withdraw the member; but, on the contrary, she looked up into his face with still less equivocal interest, and appeared to listen to his voice with an absorbed attention. Cited from The Water-Witch, or, The Skimmer of the Seas, by James Fenimore Cooper
  • Dudley pondered an instant, and then he commenced a less equivocal enumeration of what he conceived to be the marvels of his tale. Cited from The Wept of Wish-Ton-Wish,byJames Fenimore Cooper
  • Now man is a part of nature and her organisation may be regarded as the foundation of his own: the word nature is therefore less equivocal than it seems, for every nature is Nature herself in one of her more specific and better articulated forms. Cited from The Life of Reason, by George Santayana
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