itself outwardly

21 examples (0.03 sec)
  • The beating of his heart did not manifest itself outwardly after all. Cited from A Little Traitor to the South, by Cyrus Townsend Brady
  • Behind those deep-set eyes passed a world of thought, of conjecture and theory and belief, that rarely expressed itself outwardly. Cited from The Web of Life, by Robert Herrick
  • The character shows itself outwardly, but it is wrought within. Cited from Reading Made Easy for Foreigners, Third Reader, by John L. Huelshof
  • This fact asserted itself outwardly as he sat there. Cited from Marzio's Crucifix and Zoroaster, by F. Marion Crawford
  • When it has taken root there and becomes firmer and firmer it will begin to show itself outwardly as the light of the face. Cited from Music Talks with Children, by Thomas Tapper
  • No wonder that the earth expresses itself outwardly in leaves, it so labors with the idea inwardly. Cited from Walden, by Henry David Thoreau
  • Mrs. Presty had long passed the age at which emotion expresses itself outwardly by a change of color. Cited from The Evil Genius, by Wilkie Collins
  • The impression of this had fixed itself outwardly, effacing the last remnant of his boyish looks. Cited from Agatha's Husband, by Dinah Maria Craik (AKA: Dinah Maria Mulock)
  • For Science shows that thought is dynamic, and the thought-force evolved by nervous action expanding itself outwardly, must affect the molecular relations of the physical man. Cited from Five Years Of Theosophy, by Various
  • It expressed itself outwardly in a general uneasiness and irritability. Cited from The Collectors, by Frank Jewett Mather, Jr.
  • He was known to be something of a scholar, and religious too: but his religion did Dot declare itself outwardly, save perhaps in a constant gentleness of manner. Cited from Nicky-Nan, Reservist, by Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch (Q)
  • If it is in thought only, it is blasphemy of the heart, whereas if it betrays itself outwardly in speech it is blasphemy of the tongue. Cited from Summa Theologica, Part II-II (Secunda Secundae), by Thomas Aquinas
  • The modern mind is therefore less demonstrative; our civilization seeks less to declare and typify itself outwardly in works of Art, manners, dress, etc. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 13, No. 77, March, 1864, by Various
  • By GESTURES we here mean the attitudes, the movements and even the language by which a mental state expresses itself outwardly without any aim or profit, from no other cause than a kind of inner itching. Cited from Laughter, by Henri Bergson
  • Only let us recollect that this personality manifests itself outwardly in two separate forms, in conduct, and in literary production, and that each of these manifestations is to be judged independently of the other. Cited from Critical Miscellanies, Vol. I, Essay 3: Byron, by John Morley
  • To this I had been forced to add not merely a roll of silver reales but my Christmas dinner, built up about the nucleus of a can of what announced itself outwardly as pork and beans. Cited from Tramping in Mexico, by Harry A. Franck
  • But the greater the apathy, which expressed itself outwardly in a sort of cheerful readiness to take things as they came, the more delighted everybody appeared to be with the repentant sinner. Cited from The Daughters of Danaus, by Mona Caird
  • What Teufelsdroeckh would call a 'Divine Idea of Cloth' is born with him; and this, like other such Ideas, will express itself outwardly, or wring his heart asunder with unutterable throes. Cited from Sartor Resartus, and On Heroes, by Thomas Carlyle
  • What Teufelsdrockh would call a "Divine Idea of Cloth" is born with him; and this, like other such Ideas, will express itself outwardly, or wring his heart asunder with unutterable throes. Cited from Sartor Resartus, by Thomas Carlyle
  • In this important particular, animate force differs from inanimate force -- the power of man, coming from within and expressing itself outwardly, is of another sort from the force of Shimose powder, which awaits some influence from without to explode it. Cited from The Art of Public Speaking, by Carnegie and Esenwein