its humanistic

20 examples (0.04 sec)
  • The medical school is known for its humanistic approach to its curriculum and training and for the diversity of its student body.
  • Kumashiro's work was noted for its humanistic themes and for its sympathetic treatment of its characters.
  • His many interests were varied, yet his especial focus was logic and its humanistic aspects and evolution.
  • In spite of that, the book became a unique source for historic research of the times and places it depicted, though its humanistic messages were mostly neglected.
  • He has argued consistently that economic development must be guided by a moral compass if globalization is to fulfill its humanistic potential.
  • The hospital was known for its humanistic, warm approach, and it served sick children from all religions: Muslim, Christian and Jewish.
  • Naya Kashmir is notable for its humanistic view of development.
  • In his lecture, he expressed the view that science has become separated from its humanistic origins and the humanities have lost their connection to metaphysical and theological concerns.
  • Washington Grove is listed on the National Register of Historic Places both for its humanistic layout and for the way the town was founded.
  • It is characterized by its humanistic orientation, using a system of self-discipline, a mentoring scheme and the wide participation that students have in it.
  • Such elements combine to make The Green Table a truly innovative work and the depth and universality of its humanistic content give it a timeless and meaningful quality.
  • With the invention of printing and the influence of the Italian Renaissance with its humanistic and pseudo-classical ideals the dissolution is completed. Cited from Wagner's Tristan und Isolde, George Ainslie Hight
  • Because of its humanistic keynote and honestly expressed style, which is preferred over pure virtuosity, the editta braun company's work is fragile and vulnerable.
  • Tian liked the story and particularly its humanistic portrayal of the years in which Tian himself had grown up, but he was immediately turned off by the film's second half, which glorified the Communist Party of China.
  • Despite its light-hearted nature and its humanistic climax, it is chided by some Internet anime critics for its slow pacing and its even slower story development, which is partly the reason it has yet to be licensed in North America despite its age.
  • Thus, the play features an ambiguous and multifaceted portrayal of scientific knowledge, celebrating it for its humanistic achievements and discoveries but also warning that it can do immense harm when in the hands of the unethical or overambitious.
  • In the years of 1940 and 1941 a total of 13720 mainly mentally ill or handicapped people were gassed by Nazis in this institution formerly well known for its humanistic traditions.
  • In his 2009 lecture, bioethicist and self-described "humanist" Leon Kass expressed his view that science has become separated from its humanistic origins, and the humanities have lost their connection to metaphysical and theological concerns.
  • The 18th century was the age of the Enlightenment in Europe, and its humanistic ideals influenced such men as Gregory Maians and Perez Bayer in Valencia, who maintained correspondence with the leading French and German thinkers of the time.
  • Under the last two dynasties, the Ming (1368-1644) and the Qing (1644-1911), China's ruling elite intensified its humanistic concentration on literature, the arts, and public administration and regarded science and technology as either trivial or narrowly utilitarian (see Culture of China).