it may be convenient

48 examples (0.04 sec)
  • Sometimes it may be convenient to use only portions of the design. Cited from Manual of Gardening (Second Edition), L. H. Bailey
  • Since, therefore, things are thus, it may be convenient here to touch a little upon these particulars. Cited from The Works of John Bunyan Volume 1, by John Bunyan
  • It may be convenient for them to have another master; but it is a convenience of their own making. Cited from The Works of Samuel Johnson in Nine Volumes, Vol. V, by Samuel Johnson
  • He can send a check monthly or at the end of the season, as it may be convenient. Cited from The Magic Egg and Other Stories, by Stockton
  • Although I have hinted at this before, yet it may be convenient briefly to touch it again. Cited from The Works of John Bunyan Volume 2, by John Bunyan
  • There may be some special scientific purposes for which it may be convenient, but the object which this resolution is intended to meet is of another character. Cited from International Conference ... Fixing a Prime Meridian ..., by Various
  • Somehow I couldn't call you 'Miss' anything, though it may be convenient to know the rest. Cited from Simon Called Peter, by Robert Keable
  • It may be convenient to mention here that on the southern sledge journey we had four thermometers with us. Cited from The South Pole, Vols 1 and 2, Roald Amundsen
  • And here it may be convenient to treat separately of the public life of the king and court, and of the private life of the people. Cited from The Seven Great Monarchies, Vol 2. (of 7): Assyria, by George Rawlinson
  • I am, consequently, again instructed to deliver you a message as soon as it may be convenient for you to receive it. Cited from Memoirs of Aaron Burr, Complete, Matthew L. Davis
  • For example, in a mitered picture-frame it may be convenient to plane up two pieces, each one long enough to make one long side and one short side. Cited from Handwork in Wood, by William Noyes
  • I afterwards often encountered these ants in the forests and it may be convenient to place together all the facts I learnt respecting them. Cited from The Naturalist in Nicaragua, by Thomas Belt
  • The bearer of this letter will give you any further information which you may require, and we shall be glad to see you here, as soon as it may be convenient for you to call. Cited from Roy Blakely, Pathfinder, by Percy Keese Fitzhugh
  • I shall be happy to receive the commands of my colleagues concerning the time when it may be convenient for them to do me the honour of admitting me to the office. Cited from Life of Adam Smith, by John Rae
  • It may be convenient for both of us if you take the case of Jemima Sandison just now, whose passbook I have got here. Cited from Second Shetland Truck System Report, by Guthrie
  • As this whole volume is one long argument, it may be convenient to the reader to have the leading facts and inferences briefly recapitulated. Cited from Origin of Species, 6th Ed., by Charles Darwin
  • If, however, there should be any point as to which you are doubtful, it may be convenient that you should again meet me here and receive such further explanations as may be desirable. Cited from A Century of Wrong, by F.W. Reitz
  • The importance of such an inquiry will become apparent as we proceed; but it may be convenient that I should call attention to the matter briefly at the outset. Cited from Causes of the Corruption of the Holy Gospels, by John Burgon
  • It may be convenient for the easy-going to deny this, and take an opposite view of the matter; but convenience is not always a safe counsellor. Cited from Explanation of Catholic Morals, by John H. Stapleton
  • It may be convenient to know how to do this sometimes; as, for instance, when one wishes to paste in a scrapbook an article printed on both sides of the paper. Cited from Composition-Rhetoric, by Stratton D. Brooks
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