I heere

10 examples (0.03 sec)
  • By all the Gods that Romans bow before, I heere discard my sicknesse. Cited from Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare
  • And to repaire my Honor lost for him, I heere renounce him, and returne to Henry. Cited from Henry VI Part 3, by William Shakespeare
  • Heauen witnesse with me, when I heere came in, And found no course of breath within your Maiestie, How cold it strooke my heart. Cited from Henry IV Part 2, by William Shakespeare
  • Navarre, give me thy hand, I heere do sweare, To ruinate this wicked Church of Rome, That hatcheth up such bloudy practices. Cited from Massacre at Paris, by Christopher Marlowe
  • But all these rare ones which I heere reherse, Do live againe in Thee, and in thy Verse: Although not in the language of their time, Yet in a speech as copious and sublime. Cited from The Lucasta Poems, by Richard Lovelace
  • And toward the education of your daughters: I heere bestow a simple instrument, And this small packet of Greeke and Latine bookes: If you accept them, then their worth is great: Bap. Cited from The Complete Shakespeare's First Folio
  • It is great sir: Pompey surnam'd the great: That oft in field, with Targe and Shield, did make my foe to sweat: And trauailing along this coast, I heere am come by chance, And lay my Armes before the legs of this sweet Lasse of France. Cited from The Complete Shakespeare's First Folio
  • King Lewis, I heere protest in sight of heauen, And by the hope I haue of heauenly blisse, That I am cleere from this misdeed of Edwards; No more my King, for he dishonors me, But most himselfe, if he could see his shame. Cited from Henry VI Part 3, by William Shakespeare
  • I do forsweare them, and I heere protest, By this white Gloue (how white the hand God knows) Henceforth my woing minde shall be exprest In russet yeas, and honest kersie noes. Cited from The Complete Shakespeare's First Folio
  • But this rough Magicke I heere abiure: and when I haue requir'd Some heauenly Musicke (which euen now I do) To worke mine end vpon their Sences, that This Ayrie-charme is for, I'le breake my staffe, Bury it certaine fadomes in the earth, And deeper then did euer Plummet sound Ile drowne my booke. Cited from The Complete Shakespeare's First Folio