humanistic movement

18 examples (0.03 sec)
  • Like Petrarch, he did much to encourage the humanistic movement by his precepts and his example. Cited from Early European History, By Hutton Webster
  • We usually regard the Reformation as a part of the Renaissance and hence included in the humanistic movement. Cited from Preaching and Paganism, by Albert Parker Fitch
  • In Northern Europe, however, the humanistic movement became blended with other tendencies. Cited from A General History, by P. V. N. Myers
  • So man in the humanistic movement moves into the center of his own world, becomes himself the measuring rod about whom all other values are grouped. Cited from Preaching and Paganism, by Albert Parker Fitch
  • In general, then, it seems to me abundantly clear that the humanistic movement has both limited and secularized Christian preaching. Cited from Preaching and Paganism, by Albert Parker Fitch
  • It lies within the limits of our task to treat of it, at least in so far as it serves to characterize the humanistic movement. Cited from Civilization of Renaissance in Italy, J Burckhardt
  • Accordingly, the humanistic movement was crossed and obscured by another, specifically religious and ostensibly more Christian than the Church. Cited from The Life of Reason, by George Santayana
  • In Germany the humanistic movement continued under Herder and his younger contemporaries, Schiller and Goethe. Cited from Preaching and Paganism, by Albert Parker Fitch
  • It is needless to dwell upon the tremendous impulse which the new art gave, not only to the humanistic movement, but to the general intellectual progress of the European nations. Cited from A General History, by P. V. N. Myers
  • He learned to write it, not only in prose, but also in verse, which leads us to suppose that the school at Eisenach took a part in the Humanistic movement already mentioned. Cited from Life of Luther, by Julius Koestlin
  • For the present it is enough to observe that through Squarcione the scientific and humanistic movement of the fifteenth century was communicated to the art of Northern Italy. Cited from Renaissance in Italy, Vol. 3, by John Addington Symonds
  • Finally, as the natural and humane sciences mark new steps in the expanding humanistic movement, so in these last days, critical scholarship, itself largely a product of the humanistic viewpoint, has added another factor to the group. Cited from Preaching and Paganism, by Albert Parker Fitch
  • What does the work of Pope Nicholas V, in establishing the Vatican Library (132), indicate as to his interest in the new humanistic movement? Cited from The History Of Education, By Ellwood P. Cubberley
  • Before going on, in a future chapter, to discuss the question as to what kind of preaching such a world-view, seen from the Christian standpoint, needs, we are now to inquire what the effect of this humanistic movement upon Christian preaching has already been. Cited from Preaching and Paganism, by Albert Parker Fitch
  • In the ranks of the humanistic movement Reuchlin alone stood forth prominently as the advocate of the Jews, and he was powerless before the prejudices of the populace. Cited from Jewish History, by S. M. Dubnow
  • Educated at the university of Erfurt, where he became acquainted with the humanistic movement, young Martin entered one of the mendicant orders -- the Augustinian -- in 1505 and went to live in a monastery. Cited from Modern Europe V.1, by Carlton J. H. Hayes
  • We have seen how Luther as a student associated with the young Humanists at Erfurt, and now, whilst striving further on that road of theology which he had marked out for himself, he was still accessible to the general interests of learning as represented by the Humanistic movement. Cited from Life of Luther, by Julius Koestlin
  • He bequeathed to posterity a model of classic poetry, which ushered in Hebrew humanism, the return to the style and the manner of the Bible, in the same way as the general humanistic movement led the European mind back upon its own steps along the paths marked out by the classic languages. Cited from Renascence Hebrew Literature, by Nahum Slouschz