his pity

387 examples (0.04 sec)
  • If a woman lost his respect she seemed to lose his pity too. Cited from The Lock and Key Library, Julian Hawthorne, Ed.
  • It was to that point above all, that his pity was directed. Cited from Les Miserables, by Victor Hugo
  • His pity for the man suddenly died a natural death. Cited from The Riddle of the Frozen Flame, by Mary E. Hanshew & Thomas W. Hanshew
  • All his pity for these two women rose again. Cited from Before the Dawn, by Joseph Alexander Altsheler
  • His pity for her increased, but his love did not. Cited from Mr. Hogarth's Will, by Catherine Helen Spence
  • The moment this thing shows itself on his stage, he puts his pity to sleep. Cited from Plays of Shakspere Unfolded, by Delia Bacon
  • He shows us His pity and sorrow still -- to no more effect with many. Cited from Expositions/Holy Scripture: John 1-14, Maclaren
  • But to-night his pity for Mary had involved him more deeply. Cited from King Coal, by Upton Sinclair
  • Women and children never called forth his pity or his mercy. Cited from Winning a Cause, by John Gilbert Thompson and Inez Bigwood
  • Nor was his pity for the man who had kept his secret so profoundly all these years. Cited from The Triumph of John Kars, by Ridgwell Cullum
  • In his love and in his pity he saved us. Cited from The Works of John Bunyan Volumes 1-3, John Bunyan
  • They introduced him softly into his chamber, where he found him in such a condition as raised his pity. Cited from The Arabian Nights Entertainments, Vol. 1, by Anon
  • At least, he could give her his pity. Cited from The Sky Line of Spruce, by Edison Marshall
  • Once he realized this, his pity was directed towards himself. Cited from The Making of a Soul, by Kathlyn Rhodes
  • She might have secured his admiration, respect, and even love, instead of his pity. Cited from A Young Girl's Wooing, by E. P. Roe
  • He knew that it was true and it served to increase the passionate quality of his pity. Cited from Gilbert Keith Chesterton, by Maisie Ward
  • As he had once been the sport of his desire, so he was to become now the sport of his pity. Cited from The Miller Of Old Church, by Ellen Glasgow
  • In spite of the words, what she had said did not seem to be an appeal for his pity. Cited from Marcella, by Mrs. Humphry Ward [AKA: Mary Augusta Arnold Ward]
  • She felt that there was something within her that merited his pity. Cited from The Mormon Prophet, by Lily Dougall
  • It was her beauty that had held him, that and the appeal which her circumstances had made to his pity. Cited from Uneasy Money, by P.G. Wodehouse
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