herd immunity

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  • Info Herd immunity or herd effect, also called community immunity, describes a form of immunity that occurs when the vaccination of a significant portion of a population (or herd) provides a measure of protection for individuals who have not developed immunity. more...
  • It is the general aim of those involved in public health to establish herd immunity in most populations.
  • The population born over the last two decades has a low herd immunity and therefore more susceptible to the virus.
  • Herd immunity can only be achieved when vaccination levels are high.
  • Besides individual protection from getting ill, some vaccination policies also aim to provide the community as a whole with herd immunity.
  • A breakthrough infection can be especially dangerous in locations where herd immunity exists.
  • Often however these vaccine programmes require the immunization of a large majority of the population to provide herd immunity.
  • He has recently completed studies of herd immunity produced by immunizing school children against influenza and school-located immunization programs led by private physicians.
  • Herd immunity refers to the idea that the pathogen will have trouble spreading when a significant part of the population has immunity against it.
  • Mass vaccination also helps to increase coverage rapidly, thus obtaining herd immunity, when a new vaccine is introduced.
  • Increasing herd immunity during an outbreak or threatened outbreak is perhaps the most widely accepted justification for mass vaccination.
  • The proportion of immune individuals in a population above which a disease may no longer persist is the herd immunity threshold.
  • In epidemiology, herd immunity is known as a dependent happening because it influences transmission over time.
  • Lack of complete vaccine coverage increases the risk of disease for the entire population, including those who have been vaccinated, because it reduces herd immunity.
  • According to the concepts of herd immunity this population whom the vaccine fails, are still protected by the immunity of those around them.
  • Universal immunisation producing a high level of herd immunity is important in the control of epidemics of rubella.
  • If the proportion of the population that is immune exceeds the herd immunity level for the disease, then the disease can no longer persist in the population.
  • Fewer individuals available to transmit the disease, reduce the incidence of it, creating herd immunity.
  • Vaccination provides herd immunity, which lowers the likelihood of an animal coming into contact with an infected animal.
  • Polio vaccination is also important in the development of herd immunity.
  • If an individual is unable to take the vaccine, vaccinating all other members of their family can help protect them from the flu (see Herd immunity).
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