her matronly

25 examples (0.03 sec)
  • The cousin started and colored red all over her matronly face and neck. Cited from Pembroke, by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman
  • Lily called to mind vividly the lines on her mother's face, her matronly figure. Cited from By the Light of the Soul, by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman
  • Her matronly fame was trodden under all men's feet. Cited from The Scarlet Letter, Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • Her matronly beauty was the wonder and praise of the community. Cited from At Last, by Marion Harland
  • He had meant nothing, and poor Vera, touched that at her matronly age any one should show her attention, had looked at him gratefully. Cited from The Secret City, by Hugh Walpole
  • He saw her open his clothes at the neck, as though the heat of that blazing fire might be a little too much, in her matronly estimation. Cited from The Chums of Scranton High at Ice Hockey, by Donald Ferguson
  • Charley dried her eyes and entered on her functions, going in her matronly little way about and about the room and folding up everything she could lay her hands upon. Cited from Bleak House, by Charles Dickens
  • Towards the evening of a wondrously fine day in the beginning of August -- a perfect day of summer in her matronly beauty, it began to rain. Cited from Sir Gibbie, by George MacDonald
  • She didn't look like one, with her matronly, mild, inanimate face, but I supposed her greatness would come out in her conversation. Cited from Greville Fane, by Henry James
  • Charley dried her eyes, and entered on her functions: going in her matronly little way about and about the room, and folding up everything she could lay her hands upon. Cited from Ten Girls from Dickens, by Kate Dickinson Sweetser
  • His eyes passed deliberately over her matronly body, as if he knew his thoughts about her were so delicate that no suspicion of indelicacy could arise out of his contact with her. Cited from The Judge, by Rebecca West
  • Mrs. Thornburgh moved on, her matronly face aglow with interest. Cited from Robert Elsmere, by Mrs. Humphry Ward
  • Countess of Crevecoeur, a woman of spirit equal to her birth and to the beauty which she preserved even in her matronly years, judged it necessary to interfere. Cited from Quentin Durward, by Sir Walter Scott
  • She wore a little cap of lace, and from her matronly costume breathed a pleasant freshness, akin to the activity of her flame. Cited from A Life's Morning, by George Gissing
  • There was no law, written or moral, which obliged her, when once freed from it, to carry about with her and thrust upon the notice of others the loathsome body of death typified by his name and her matronly title. Cited from At Last, by Marion Harland
  • But in the face of this newspaper-reading woman (yes, he had unaccountably felt it jar upon him that a lady should be reading a newspaper), under her matronly smile, he could do no more than plump out his 'quite sure'. Cited from Born In Exile, By George Gissing
  • She was dressed in perfect taste with reference to her matronly years, and the lingering evidences of her widowhood, and she had an unaffected naturalness of manner which even at her age of forty-eight could not be called less than charming. Cited from A Foregone Conclusion, by W. D. Howells
  • With Mrs. Scudder his success was immediate, she was completely won over by the deferential manner with which he constantly referred himself to her matronly judgments, and, on returning to the house, she warmly pressed him to stay to dinner. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 4, No. 21, July, 1859, by Various
  • Mary, in her matronly days, became as solid in figure as her mother; but, unlike her, gave the boys little formal teaching, so that Mrs. Garth was alarmed lest they should never be well grounded in grammar and geography. Cited from Middlemarch, by George Eliot[#1]
  • Mrs. Vance, no longer occupied in the whirlpool of speculation, for the first time observed that Vera had changed her matronly robe of black lace for a short white skirt and a white shirtwaist. Cited from Vera, The Medium, by Richard Harding Davis
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