her collar

217 examples (0.03 sec)
  • They had opened her collar and taken out her hairpins, whatever good that might do. Cited from The Man in Lower Ten, by Mary Roberts Rinehart
  • The girl drew her collar up about her neck. Cited from The Triumph of John Kars, by Ridgwell Cullum
  • A large gendarme caught her collar with his red hand and shook her. Cited from Mother, by Maxim Gorky
  • She didn't mind the warm blood that soaked her collar and ran down her neck. Cited from The Foolish Virgin, by Thomas Dixon
  • She put up her own hand desperately to tear at her collar. Cited from Come Rack! Come Rope!, by Robert Hugh Benson
  • At around age 20, her collar will turn from red to white.
  • Gordon knew that the best thing to do was to lower her head and unfasten her collar. Cited from Gordon Keith, by Thomas Nelson Page
  • Her hands dropped, she did not even unbutton her collar. Cited from A Mere Accident, by George Moore
  • Little was relieved, although her collar was disfigured for the evening past hope. Cited from Home Scenes, and Home Influence, T.S. Arthur
  • Her neck was very thin, and her collar-bones showed. Cited from Young Lucretia and Other Stories, by Mary E. Wilkins
  • He even went as far as to give Maleficent bat-looking wings for her collar.
  • She felt her neck was swelling her collar-band. Cited from Pointed Roofs (Pilgrimage 1), Dorothy Richardson
  • She had twenty one injuries in her body and her collar bone and wrist bone had broken.
  • Her collar dogs indicate that she is a member of the Royal Engineers.
  • Billie felt as if a rough hand had seized her by her collar and given her a good shaking. Cited from The Motor Maids in Fair Japan, by Katherine Stokes
  • "I can talk to you -- and when you wear her collar you will know my Queen -- our Queen." Cited from Three Weeks, by Elinor Glyn
  • When Maria got home she found her aunt Maria all dressed, except for her collar-fastening. Cited from By the Light of the Soul, by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman
  • The shadow took her faded dress into shelter but fell revengefully into the little cup behind her collar-bone. Cited from Dubliners, by James Joyce
  • Meg was on her feet again, and trying to brush the snow off her coat and out of her collar. Cited from Four Little Blossoms and Their Winter Fun, by Mabel C. Hawley
  • The bones were chicken bones and her collar had been lost prior.
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