heere I

22 examples (0.03 sec)
  • Nor so deere, nor entire, while heere I rest: That day hath in one mine both opprest. Cited from Literary and Philosophical Essays, by Various
  • "Where since he found you not, He asked of me the place of your abode,-- And heere I have brought him?" Cited from A Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. III, by Various
  • Heere I recreated myselfe running a naked swoord into the sand. Cited from Voyages of Peter Esprit Radisson,by Peter Radisson
  • I, heere he dide, and heere I him imbrace! Cited from The Spanish Tragedie, by Thomas Kyd
  • And heere I thought requisite, to lay downe the names of such Cornish gentlemen, as I find recorded to haue come in with the Conquerour. Cited from The Survey of Cornwall, by Richard Carew
  • Sound Drums and Trumpets, farwell sowre annoy, For heere I hope begins our lasting ioy. Cited from The Complete Shakespeare's First Folio
  • But for this Lord, Who hath abus'd me as he knowes himselfe, Though yet he neuer harm'd me, heere I quit him. Cited from The Complete Shakespeare's First Folio
  • Heere I will not make a long discours during that time, onely made good cheere & killed staggs, Buffes, Elends, and Castors. Cited from Voyages of Peter Esprit Radisson,by Peter Radisson
  • I speake not to disprooue what Brutus spoke, But heere I am, to speake what I do know; You all did loue him once, not without cause, What cause with-holds you then, to mourne for him? Cited from Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare
  • And heere I vow, so you but giue consent And will conceale my resolution, I will ere long determine of their deathes That causeles thus haue murderd my sonne. Cited from The Spanish Tragedie, by Thomas Kyd
  • And heere I draw a Sword, Whose worthy temper I intend to staine With the best blood that I can meete withall, In the aduenture of this perillous day. Cited from Henry IV Part 1, by William Shakespeare
  • O heere I lift this one hand vp to heauen, And bow this feeble ruine to the earth, If any power pitties wretched teares, To that I call: what wilt thou kneele with me? Cited from Titus Andronicus, by William Shakespeare
  • All studies heere I solemnly defie, Saue how to gall and pinch this Bullingbrooke, And that same Sword and Buckler Prince of Wales. Cited from The Complete Shakespeare's First Folio
  • I must repent: Goe therefore tell thy Master, heere I am; My Ransome, is this frayle and worthlesse Trunke; My Army, but a weake and sickly Guard: Yet God before, tell him we will come on, Though France himselfe, and such another Neighbor Stand in our way. Cited from Henry V, by William Shakespeare
  • This you may know, And so deliuer, I am put to Sea With her, who heere I cannot hold on shore: And most opportune to her neede, I haue A Vessell rides fast by, but not prepar'd For this designe. Cited from The Complete Shakespeare's First Folio
  • Yes, heere I tender it for him in the Court, Yea, twice the summe, if that will not suffice, I will be bound to pay it ten times ore, On forfeit of my hands, my head, my heart: If this will not suffice, it must appeare That malice beares downe truth. Cited from The Complete Shakespeare's First Folio
  • Now thy proud Necke, beares halfe my burthen'd yoke, From which, euen heere I slip my wearied head, And leaue the burthen of it all, on thee. Cited from Richard III, by William Shakespeare
  • Sweet Love, prepare thee to be Philips Bryde; For heere I sweare, as I am royall borne, Ile marry thee before the mornings Sunne Hath runne the third part of his glorious course. Cited from A Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. III, by Various
  • Heere I suffered muche trouble and affliction, beyng enforced to hyde myselfe among these poore folkes, fayning myselfe very sicke, to the ende that none should be inquisityue what I was, whence I came, or whyther I would. Cited from Pilgrimage to Al-Madinah & Meccah 2, R Burton
  • Heere I kneele: If ere my will did trespasse 'gainst his Loue, Either in discourse of thought, or actuall deed, Or that mine Eyes, mine Eares, or any Sence Delighted them: or any other Forme. Cited from The Complete Shakespeare's First Folio
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