heere he

14 examples (0.02 sec)
  • Oh heere he is: lay hand vpon him, Sir. Cited from King Lear, by William Shakespeare
  • Heere he is, heere he is: how ist with you sir? Cited from The Complete Shakespeare's First Folio
  • Heere he throwes it from him and beares the body away. Cited from The Spanish Tragedie, by Thomas Kyd
  • See heere he comes, and my Ladies two pages, they have been tickling the vanity ont yfaith. Cited from A Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. III, by Various
  • And heere he comes that murdred my delight. Cited from The Spanish Tragedie, by Thomas Kyd
  • Heere he comes passing luckely; Ile counterfeit business with him in all poste haste possible. Cited from A Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. III, by Various
  • I, heere he dide, and heere I him imbrace! Cited from The Spanish Tragedie, by Thomas Kyd
  • There's no man in the world More bound to's Mother, yet heere he let's me prate Like one i'th' Stockes. Cited from Coriolanus, by William Shakespeare
  • I thinke you all haue drunke of Circes cup: If heere you hous'd him, heere he would haue bin. Cited from The Complete Shakespeare's First Folio
  • I haue then sinn'd against his experience, and transgrest against his valour, and my state that way is dangerous, since I cannot yet find in my heart to repent: Heere he comes, I pray you make vs freinds, I will pursue the amitie. Cited from The Complete Shakespeare's First Folio
  • Thou hast spoke for vs (Madona) as if thy eldest sonne should be a foole: whose scull, Ioue cramme with braines, for heere he comes. Cited from The Complete Shakespeare's First Folio
  • Weene you of better lucke, I meane in periur'd Witnesse, then your Master, Whose Minister you are, whiles heere he liu'd Vpon this naughty Earth? Cited from Henry VIII, by William Shakespeare
  • I gaue my Loue a Ring, and made him sweare Neuer to part with it, and heere he stands: I dare be sworne for him, he would not leaue it, Nor plucke it from his finger, for the wealth That the world masters. Cited from The Complete Shakespeare's First Folio
  • This Letter doth make good the Friers words, Their course of Loue, the tydings of her death: And heere he writes, that he did buy a poyson Of a poore Pothecarie, and therewithall Came to this Vault to dye, and lye with Iuliet. Cited from The Complete Shakespeare's First Folio