gradual abolition

186 examples (0.01 sec)
  • However, although he supported its gradual abolition, he did not free his own slaves.
  • How much stronger then was the argument for immediate than for gradual abolition! Cited from Abolition of the African Slave Trade, Vol. II, by Thomas Clarkson
  • Their gradual abolition laws freed future children at birth, and all slaves after a certain date or period of years.
  • At present his own opinion was, that gradual abolition would answer the end proposed in the least exceptionable manner. Cited from Abolition of the African Slave Trade, Vol. II, by Thomas Clarkson
  • Gradual abolition is the only mode which at present appears likely to receive the public sanction. Cited from The Journal of Negro History, Volume 6, 1921, by Various
  • How much stronger, then, was the argument, for immediate than for gradual abolition! Cited from Abolition of the African Slave-Trade, by Thomas Clarkson
  • At various times in his life, Washington privately expressed strong support for the gradual abolition of slavery.
  • The bill for gradual abolition displeased those who were most deeply interested in the matter. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 8, No. 50, December, 1861, by Various
  • How much stronger, then, is the argument for immediate than gradual abolition! Cited from The American Union Speaker, by John D. Philbrick
  • He proposed the gradual abolition of poor laws by gradually reducing the number of persons qualifying for relief.
  • If held beyond that period, the state's Gradual Abolition Act gave slaves the legal power to free themselves.
  • Most northern states passed legislation for gradual abolition.
  • The gradual abolition of personal servitude, hardly accomplished in three successive centuries, now began. Cited from Handbook of Universal Literature,A. C. Lynch Botta
  • Pennsylvania passed a gradual abolition law in 1780 which prohibited non-residents from holding slaves in the state longer than six months.
  • The committee having divided again, the votes for a gradual abolition were two hundred and thirty, and those against any abolition were eighty-five. Cited from Abolition of the African Slave Trade, Vol. II, by Thomas Clarkson
  • And this is the practical result of the much-lauded plan of gradual abolition. Cited from Conflict With Slavery, by Whitter,V7, Part 1
  • Besides, the plan of gradual abolition has been tried in this country and the West Indies, and found wanting. Cited from Whittier's Conflict, Reform, Vol. 7, Complete
  • The committee having divided again, the votes for a gradual abolition were, two hundred and thirty, and those against any abolition were eighty-five. Cited from Abolition of the African Slave-Trade, by Thomas Clarkson
  • When this law was passed, the framers of it considered that the gradual abolition of slavery would be secured. Cited from North America, Vol. 2, by Anthony Trollope
  • When the Gradual Abolition Act was drafted, the federal government had a single branch - Congress - which met in the city.
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