give timely notice

28 examples (0.03 sec)
  • "If anything serious is to happen, you are bound to give timely notice." Cited from The Monikins, by J. Fenimore Cooper
  • He recognised it as one of those sent up the estuary to keep watch and to give timely notice of the approach of an enemy. Cited from Exiled for the Faith, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • A hand was accordingly stationed aloft to give timely notice should a sail appear in sight. Cited from The Missing Ship, by W. H. G. Kingston
  • He sent forward an advanced guard, and kept a rear guard at some distance to give timely notice of the approach of an enemy, should they be pursued. Cited from Ronald Morton, or the Fire Ships, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • Still the men persevered, one or two sentinels being placed to watch the Indians, and give timely notice of their approach, should they advance. Cited from Wyandotte, by James Fenimore Cooper
  • Scouts were sent out in all directions to give timely notice of his approach, but they were able to reach the forces of Fairfax before he came. Cited from Hayslope Grange, by Emma Leslie
  • Its senses of smell and hearing are extremely acute, and serve to give timely notice of the approach of enemies. Cited from The Illustrated London Reading Book, by Various
  • Two of our party, however, stood assemblies during the remainder of the night, to give timely notice of the approach of the enemy, should the pirates have discovered us. Cited from In the Eastern Seas, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • The path led to one of those watchtowers which the Spaniards keep on the coast to give timely notice of the approach of privateers. Cited from The Pirates Own Book, by Charles Ellms
  • Rolf and Quonab were sent to scout in that country and if possible give timely notice of raiders in force. Cited from Rolf in the Woods, by Ernest Thompson Seton
  • Dreams which give timely notice of coming accidents are, unfortunately, quite as often useless as they are efficacious for the protection of those to whom they are sent. Cited from Real Ghost Stories, by William T. Stead
  • The arrival of the expected convoy was soon more distinctly heard, but no scouts or outposts had been stationed to give timely notice, of the enemy's movements. Cited from History United Netherlands, 1586c by Motley
  • Having secured the negroes in the out-houses, and placed guards over them, and videttes on the look-out to give timely notice of any surprise, we proceeded to our work of plunder. Cited from The Privateersman, by Frederick Marryat
  • A select battalion, commanded by Major Price, moved in front of the legion, sufficiently in advance to give timely notice for the troops to form in case of action. Cited from Life And Times Of Washington, V2, by Schroeder, &c
  • His vedettes were thrown far out toward the enemy to give timely notice of any movement for he was determined to prevent the rebels from entering the town if possible, and knew the First Corps would soon be up to support him. Cited from Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, by Abner Doubleday
  • We did not neglect the usual precautions to prevent a surprise, and two of the young men at a time took post as sentinels a little way down the mountain, to give timely notice of the approach of a foe. Cited from Dick Onslow, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • June made her companion observe a man in a tree, a look-out, as she said, to give timely notice of the approach of any boat, although, the departure of the expedition being so recent, nothing but some unexpected event would be likely to bring it back so soon. Cited from The Pathfinder, by James Fenimore Cooper
  • We must have gone several miles when two of the Indians, without taking any supper, lay down, placing me between them, with a blanket thrown over all three of us, while the other walked about on the watch, to give timely notice should we be pursued. Cited from Snow Shoes and Canoes, by William H. G. Kingston
  • He held the line in his hand, and Judith was stationed at a loop on the side of the cabin next the shore, where she could watch the beach and the rocks and give timely notice of the approach of either friend or foe. Cited from Initial Studies in American Letters, by Henry A. Beers
  • He held the line in his hand, and Judith was stationed at a loop, on the side of the cabin next the shore, where she could watch the beach and the rock, and give timely notice of the approach of either friend or foe. Cited from The Deerslayer, by James Fenimore Cooper
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