gigantic boulders

20 examples (0.02 sec)
  • Three gigantic boulders extended above the water about fifty feet from shore, with a very crooked channel between. Cited from Through the Grand Canyon from Wyoming to Mexico, by E. L. Kolb
  • Then he lifted and set in the entrance of the cave a gigantic boulder of a door-stone. Cited from Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew, by J. Peabody
  • On a bare hill-top seven gigantic boulders keep guard round the simple tombstone on which his name is engraved. Cited from Victorian Worthies, by George Henry Blore
  • It has no business among these mountains, these rivers and lakes, these gigantic boulders, these tangled valleys and dark mountain gorges. Cited from Wild Northern Scenes, by S. H. Hammond
  • Across a narrow valley gigantic boulders seemed to have accumulated and formed masses that appeared to be slowly creeping downward. Cited from See America First, by Orville O. Hiestand
  • Against the face of a gigantic boulder was a balsam shelter. Cited from The Hunted Woman, by James Oliver Curwood
  • A gigantic boulder, poised high up on the other side of the canon, was unseated, and fell with a terrific crash. Cited from The Golden Fleece, by Julian Hawthorne
  • After Koomatipoort was passed the train crept slowly into the mountainous district, where huge peaks pierced the clouds and gigantic boulders overhung the tracks. Cited from With the Boer Forces, by Howard C. Hillegas
  • There was a broad waste of heath, with gigantic boulders strewn as though in pre-historic times Titans had waged there a mighty battle. Cited from The Magician, by Somerset Maugham
  • Sometimes, in order to pass the gigantic boulders that stretched far off from the shore, the boat had to be shot around and hauled in below, an operation requiring skill, strength, and celerity. Cited from A Canyon Voyage, by Frederick S. Dellenbaugh
  • Finally we crossed what appeared to be a boundary fence, and immediately afterwards found ourselves amongst a wilderness of stones and gigantic boulders, with the roar of the waves as they beat on the rocks below to keep us company. Cited from From John O'Groats to Land's End, by Robert Naylor and John Naylor
  • One of these nullahs was a fearsome place: half-way down the descent the path had a twist in it and at the angle of the turn was a gigantic boulder almost blocking the way. Cited from With Our Army in Palestine, by Antony Bluett
  • The highway crossed the neighboring stream on a treacherous-looking bridge, the central pier of which was built of the crudest kind of masonry piled on top of a gigantic boulder in midstream. Cited from Inca Land, by Hiram Bingham
  • The shores were strewn with a litter of gigantic boulders -- fallen sections of the overhanging cliffs. Cited from Through the Grand Canyon from Wyoming to Mexico, by E. L. Kolb
  • To this era is referred the erratic blocks, or gigantic boulder stones, which have been driven by floods across our continents, or drifted in icebergs over valleys, and perched sometimes on mountain tops. Cited from An Expository Outline, by Anonymous
  • The face of nature was desolated as by a tornado, and the gigantic boulders and loose rocks found on the prairies are the missiles hurled by the mighty combatants. Cited from The Myths of the New World, by Daniel G. Brinton
  • Two hours of the hardest kind of work in and out of the water, climbing over gigantic boulders along the bank, lifting the boats and sliding them on driftwood skids, tugging, pulling, shoving every minute with might and main put us at the bottom. Cited from A Canyon Voyage, by Frederick S. Dellenbaugh
  • The uppermost is fifteen feet above the second, and is covered with gigantic boulders, and vast rotting trunks of fallen pines, buried in an impenetrable jungle of dwarf small-leaved holly and rhododendrons. Cited from Himalayan Journals (Complete), by J. D. Hooker
  • Perhaps this had its unnerving influence, though swift and surefooted ordinarily, her ankle turned amidst the gravel shifting beneath her flying steps, and she sank suddenly to the ground, slipped down a precipitous incline, caught herself, half crouching against a gigantic boulder. Cited from The Ordeal, by Charles Egbert Craddock
  • The author does not appear aware of a case published by me "Geographical Journal" volume 9 page 528, of a gigantic boulder embedded in an iceberg in the Antarctic Ocean, almost certainly one hundred miles distant from any land, and perhaps much more distant. Cited from The Voyage of the Beagle, by Charles Darwin