gentlemanly feeling

32 examples (0.03 sec)
  • There is an air of gentlemanly feeling spread over the book which tends still further to recommend the author. Cited from Uncollected Writings of Thomas de Quincey--Vol. 1, by Thomas de Quincey
  • Such insinuations are only for horse-dealers, not for men of high gentlemanly feeling. Cited from Mr. Sponge's Sporting Tour, by R. S. Surtees
  • The stranger visiting the United States is surprised with the entire absence of gentlemanly feeling in political affairs. Cited from Englishwoman in America, by I. Lucy Bird
  • I am sure we are greatly indebted to the admirable tact and gentlemanly feeling shown by your husband. Cited from The Devil's Disciple, by George Bernard Shaw
  • By placing the smallest confidence in the gentlemanly feeling of another man! Cited from Rhoda Fleming by George Meredith, v2
  • They are one of the few admirable races still surviving, and they conduct this siege with real consideration and gentlemanly feeling. Cited from Ladysmith, by H. W. Nevinson
  • "Do you think that I am so wanting in gentlemanly feeling that I should wish to visit the sin of another upon your head?" Cited from Devon Boys, by George Manville Fenn
  • As an older man it behoved me to read the Chevalier a lesson in manners and gentlemanly feeling. Cited from Bardelys the Magnificent, by Rafael Sabatini
  • But that is not the point -- nobody expects gentlemanly feeling or speech from Mr. Chamberlain. Cited from Sketches In The House, by T. P. O'Connor
  • Did he intend to banish honour, humanity and virtue, loyalty, courtesy and gentlemanly feeling from Spain? Cited from The Works of Samuel Johnson in Nine Volumes, Vol. V, by Samuel Johnson
  • He shook hands once more, and left the room, Max thoroughly grasping the gentlemanly feeling which had prompted him to behave with so much delicacy. Cited from Three Boys, by George Manville Fenn
  • He had neither religion nor moral principle; and that kind of gentlemanly feeling which from association he did possess, only made him feel more sensibly the degradation from which it could not preserve him. Cited from The Opium Habit, by Horace B. Day
  • He has sense, plenty of it, shrewd, strong, common sense, and more real gentlemanly feeling than we on shore generally suppose, a good deal of faith, and certain standing principles of sea-morality. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 3, No. 15, January, 1859, by Various
  • I heard many persons speak of his unaffected and amiable manners, yet he could not escape the dislike which every trace of gentlemanly feeling is sure to create among the ordinary class of Americans. Cited from Domestic Manners of the Americans, by Fanny Trollope
  • To a dog of gentlemanly feeling theft and falsehood are disgraceful vices. Cited from Essays of Robert Louis Stevenson, by Robert Louis Stevenson
  • He says nothing could be more exemplary than Kendal's whole conduct in India, he only regretted that he kept so much aloof from others, that his principle and gentlemanly feeling did not tell as much as could have been wished. Cited from The Young Step-Mother,Charlotte M. Yonge
  • The Professor is not now, as regards worldly prosperity, the man he used to be; but his gentlemanly feeling still clings to him, and his pride in his profession is as enthusiastic as ever. Cited from Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, Mar 1844, Vol. 23, Nbr. 3
  • There exists in England a gentlemanly character, a gentlemanly feeling, very different even from that which is the most like it, the character of a well-born Spaniard, and unexampled in the rest of Europe. Cited from Confessions of an Inquiring Spirit, Coleridge #2
  • Far be it from me to depreciate the value of this gentlemanly feeling: I respect it under all its forms and varieties, from the House of Commons * to the gentleman in the one-shilling gallery. Cited from Table Talk of S. T. Coleridge, by Coleridge
  • Far be it from me to depreciate the value of this gentlemanly feeling: I respect it under all its forms and varieties, from the House of Commons to the gentleman in the shilling gallery. Cited from Confessions of an Inquiring Spirit, Coleridge #2
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