gaunt

All Noun Adjective
6,600 examples (0.05 sec)
  • The balance of power began to swing back towards the king after Gaunt's return.
  • The balance of power began to swing back towards the king after Gaunt's return.
  • According to Gaunt, the first musical instrument he played was the piano.
  • He tells her what Gaunt has taught them.
  • Initially, there were only attacks on certain properties, many of them associated with John of Gaunt.
  • We are all gaunt and bony now, and have dark shadows around our eyes.
  • It was the face and figure of a man -- tall, gaunt and worn. Cited from The Big Otter, by R.M. Ballantyne
  • They went to church together, and Mrs. Gaunt's appearance there created no small sensation. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 102, April, 1866, by Various
  • They went to church together, and Mrs. Gaunt's appearance there created no small sensation. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 102, April, 1866, by Various
  • They were so gaunt, they were so ragged, they were so tired! Cited from The Long Roll, by Mary Johnston
  • His eye was hollow and his body gaunt, as though he had fasted long. Cited from Folk-Lore and Legends: North American Indian, by Anonymous
  • He has remained with the unit ever since, and has been the moral conscience of Gaunt on more than one occasion.
  • There were two other tall, gaunt creatures, also feeding near, and two small animals of the same kind. Cited from Black Bruin, by Clarence Hawkes
  • But John of Gaunt's chair was nothing to King John's table. Cited from Tales & Novels, Vol. IX, by Maria Edgeworth
  • She was dark and lean; without being tall, she looked gaunt. Cited from On the Stairs, by Henry B. Fuller
  • Gaunt makes an impression on the towns people, who he also has pull some pranks.
  • Gaunt lost interest in the property after he gave up his role as the Lieutenant of the Marches.
  • Mrs. Gaunt soon found that she really missed him. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 102, April, 1866, by Various
  • Gaunt and his child must be once more safe within the walls of the fort, or -- well, that must not be thought of. Cited from The Missing Merchantman, by Harry Collingwood
  • In four days they reached Gaunt's camp. Cited from Christopher Carson, by John S. C. Abbott
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