gaunt trees

28 examples (0.03 sec)
  • He entered the Park by the first gate and walked along under the gaunt trees. Cited from Dubliners, by James Joyce
  • Just then, for the morning was beginning to show through the gaunt trees, a bird-note sounded. Cited from Joyce of the North Woods, by Harriet T. Comstock
  • For an instant he paused and looked out over the sweep of forest, with the gaunt trees standing like sentinels. Cited from The Lady of Big Shanty, by Frank Berkeley Smith
  • There were two large gaunt trees on either side of a brick walk, and that walk had been swept to the last degree of neatness. Cited from A Poor Wise Man, by Mary Roberts Rinehart
  • The gaunt trees were like grotesque old men. Cited from Jean-Christophe, Vol. I, by Romain Rolland
  • On either side of the narrow road grew the thickest of underbrush with the great, gaunt trees stretching above like silent sentinels. Cited from Her Weight in Gold, by George Barr McCutcheon
  • The tall gaunt trees groaned aloud, and bowed and trembled like slaves bending before their masters. Cited from Vikram and the Vampire, by Sir Richard F. Burton
  • Gaunt trees that interlace, Through whose flayed fingers I see too clearly The nakedness of the place. Cited from Old and New Masters, by Robert Lynd
  • On either side gaunt trees crowded, overhanging the chimneys with their creaking boughs. Cited from Kilgorman, A Story of Ireland in 1798, by Talbot Baines Reed
  • There was something solemn and rather depressing in the deep silence of that gloomy forest, with the tall gaunt trees towering above our heads and shutting out the sky itself from view. Cited from Hurricane Hurry, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • A dismal March afternoon, an earth hard as iron, with black frost, a wild wind troubling the gaunt trees, and howling mournfully around the old house. Cited from Kate Danton, or, Captain Danton's Daughters, by May Agnes Fleming
  • Russet refuse strewed the paths and the gaunt trees waved fleshless arms in the breeze. Cited from Children of the Ghetto, by I. Zangwill [AKA: Israel Zangwill]
  • The moorland ridges shone clear under the moon, now bare, or scantily plumed by gaunt trees, and now clothed in a dense blackness of wood. Cited from The Case of Richard Meynell, by Mrs. Humphry Ward
  • In the corners under the hedges, the cows and horses sheltered in little groups, and the few gaunt trees which grew on that exposed coast groaned and creaked as they bent away from the storm. Cited from By Berwen Banks, by Allen Raine
  • The small arc of light made by the corner gaslamp lessened but little the darkness of the seemingly deserted street, and for a while we could distinguish nothing save the shadows cast by the gaunt trees of the Square. Cited from People Like That, by Kate Langley Bosher
  • Great mills and manufactories, with only a night- watchman's light in the lowest of their many stories, began to take the place of the gloomy farm-houses and gaunt trees that had startled him with their grotesque shapes. Cited from Gallegher and Other Stories, by R. H. Davis
  • Only a few gaunt trees had been left standing, mere skeletons of what they had been, every branch and twig swept away by shells and bullets and even the bark stripped off, leaving the trunks in ghastly nakedness. Cited from Army Boys in the French Trenches, by Homer Randall
  • Steep banks rose from the riverside and lost themselves in a haze of frost, through which, more eminent, stood the boles and giant members of vast gaunt trees, their upper branches fretting the starry sky. Cited from Doom Castle, by Neil Munro
  • On the day of the sacrifice I was bidden to be present, and not daring to refuse, I accompanied the queen to a barren spot at the foot of the mountain where some gaunt trees rose out of a bed of lava. Cited from Adventures in Southern Seas, by George Forbes
  • Great mills and manufactories, with only a night-watchman's light in the lowest of their many stories, began to take the place of the gloomy farmhouses and gaunt trees that had startled him with their grotesque shapes. Cited from Short Stories for English Courses, Rosa Mikels ed.
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