Gaunt had

54 examples (0.04 sec)
  • Gaunt had not told the old man that he was going into the Northern army: how could he? Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 10, No, 59, Sep, 1862
  • He did it only because Gaunt had put him in a temper at one o'clock. Cited from The Channings: A Story, by Mrs. Henry Wood
  • One great fear Mrs. Gaunt had entertained before marriage ceased to haunt her. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 101, March, 1866, by Various
  • John of Gaunt had three sons by Catherine Swynford before she became his wife. Cited from Henry VIII, by A. F. Pollard
  • He next reminded Neville that Gaunt had been her servant for years. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 101, March, 1866, by Various
  • Most writers have said more or less directly that Chaucer lost the office because John of Gaunt had left England earlier in the same year. Cited from Chaucer's Official Life, by James Root Hulbert
  • Gaunt had his mother's: brown, calm, and steady. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 103, May, 1866, by Various
  • Mrs. Gaunt had gradually sunk almost to her knees. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 103, May, 1866, by Various
  • While Pinkerton and Allen were building the southern extension, Thomas Gaunt had been active in the area.
  • Then, all in one movement as it seemed, Gaunt had risen and turned to the window, and stood there awhile with his back to the room. Cited from The Amateur Gentleman, by Jeffery Farnol
  • Blanche and Gaunt had seven children, three of whom survived infancy.
  • Gaunt had a great taste for reading; Mr. Gaunt had not: what was the consequence? Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 101, March, 1866, by Various
  • John of Gaunt had four illegitimate children with his mistress, Katherine Swynford, later his wife.
  • A woman named Elizabeth Gaunt had the gruesome distinction of being the last woman burnt alive in England for political crimes.
  • Meanwhile Gaunt had gone up to scatter the noisy crew. Cited from The Channings: A Story, by Mrs. Henry Wood
  • This surmise was confirmed by the fact that when Mr Gaunt had entered the captain's state-room he had found the chronometers still going, though nearly run down. Cited from The Missing Merchantman, by Harry Collingwood
  • At age 30, John Gaunt had a final fateful confrontation with his brothers.
  • Grave difficulties still beset the government, and in January, 1377, John of Gaunt had to face another parliament. Cited from The History of England, by T.F. Tout
  • Gaunt had discarded his surplice with his schoolboy life; but curiosity with regard to the seniorship brought him amongst them again that day. Cited from The Channings: A Story, by Mrs. Henry Wood
  • He is noted to have always been in the forefront of any plans Gaunt had, due to his ruthless efficiency and tactical insight when leading his troops.
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