gaunt and haggard

35 examples (0.03 sec)
  • He lost his appetite, became gaunt and haggard, and could get no sleep. Cited from The Wit and Humor of America, Volume VII (of X), by Various
  • He did not know what a gaunt and haggard madman he appeared. Cited from Cobwebs and Cables, by Hesba Stretton
  • He was too ill to read it, but sat, gaunt and haggard, with burning eyes, while his friend spoke for him. Cited from History of California, by Helen Elliott Bandini
  • Gaunt and haggard -- he had certainly lost every one of his good looks, except his distinction -- that seemed more marked than ever. Cited from Halcyone, by Elinor Glyn
  • He was so mechanical in the performance of his duties that his associates wondered at him, and he grew more gaunt and haggard than ever. Cited from His Sombre Rivals, by E. P. Roe
  • They were gaunt and haggard from nearly three months of hardship and exposure. Cited from Kafir Stories, by William Charles Scully
  • He looked unusually tall as he stood in the broad, low entrance; his ten days of sickness and inactivity had made him gaunt and haggard. Cited from The Bells of San Juan, by Jackson Gregory
  • He looked gaunt and haggard in the dim light. Cited from Greatheart, by Ethel M. Dell
  • He was a tall man, gaunt and haggard-eyed, as many men are in the bush; he may have been but little past middle age, and grey before his time. Cited from Children of the Bush, by Henry Lawson
  • I could see him in the road-house at night, gaunt and haggard, drinking at the bar, a desperate, degraded cripple. Cited from The Trail of '98, by Robert W. Service
  • Although young and strongly made he was pale, gaunt and haggard, with a look about the eyes and mouth which denoted the habitual drunkard. Cited from The Garret and the Garden, by R.M. Ballantyne
  • A little afterward a gaunt and haggard old man, bareheaded and very hastily dressed, reined his horse by the Queen's side. Cited from Chivalry, by James Branch Cabell
  • He stalked, gaunt and haggard-eyed, down the hill, threading his way through the growing traffic of the day, and faced his business with the lady in the case. Cited from Rest Harrow, By Maurice Hewlett
  • Presently there moved towards her a lady in a Bath-chair; a lady who had once been beautiful, but now, though scarcely middle-aged, looked gaunt and haggard from some long illness. Cited from The Whirlpool, by George Gissing
  • His brow lowered, his cheek got gaunt and haggard, and his eye hollow and wolfish with ferocity. Cited from Valentine M'Clutchy, The Irish Agent, by William Carleton
  • Ephraim's face was gaunt and haggard as she had never seen it before; his eyes were large, and she thought she read unutterable distress in them, but could not understand. Cited from The Mormon Prophet, by Lily Dougall
  • Trade, markets, wages, hours, and all the gaunt and haggard economics of the labour question, added to the statesman's load. Cited from The Life of William Ewart Gladstone, Vol. 1 (of 3), by John Morley
  • The grey, gaunt and haggard, but their colours with them, overpassed the dead and wounded, now choking the sunken road. Cited from The Long Roll, by Mary Johnston
  • The roof was formed of porous stalactite, through which a moonlit vapor appeared to pass, casting its brilliant light upon our gaunt and haggard figures. Cited from A Journey to the Centre of the Earth, by Jules Verne
  • One was gaunt and haggard, his face disfigured by a great red scar, the other was a shockheaded individual who moved with a shambling gait. Cited from The Prodigal Judge, by Vaughan Kester
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