forfeiture for

26 examples (0.04 sec)
  • Forfeiture for the national utility, and that of the human race, was evidently one of its principles, and yet how did it act? Cited from History of the Girondists, Volume I, by Alphonse de Lamartine
  • Similar to all property in Nevada, property held by allodial title is subject to forfeiture for criminal conduct.
  • What is the forfeiture for taking usury in this state? Cited from The Government Class Book, by Andrew W. Young
  • Not only can no more be collected on any contract or obligation than the legal rate, but in most of the states there is some forfeiture for taking usurious interest. Cited from The Government Class Book, by Andrew W. Young
  • During the Civil War, however, it became important to landowners to protect their properties in the interest of children and descendants from forfeiture for treason. Cited from A Short History of English Agriculture, by W. H. R. Curtler
  • Forfeiture for felony was incurred only by those that fled. Cited from Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. VII. (of 12), by Burke
  • When James III of Scotland found out about the treaty in 1476, he issued a sentence of forfeiture for MacDonald's lands.
  • It prohibited "forfeiture for treason of [by] dead persons not attainted or judged in their lives."
  • He read "this chain of cross-references" to "explicitly permit criminal forfeiture for general mail fraud, not just for mail fraud against financial institutions."
  • A landlord may not now exercise a right of re-entry or forfeiture for failure to pay a service charge unless it has been agreed by the tenant or has been the subject of a determination by a court or appeal tribunal.
  • The Lower House now, contemptuously disregarding both principles and precedents, took on itself to carve estates out of the forfeitures for persons whom it was inclined to favour. Cited from History of England, James II V. 5, Macaulay
  • They were men who stayed behind while the others went to the war; they fought the fight with their tongues, with writs of forfeiture for high treason, became great statesmen, and in time aspired to become members of the committee. Cited from The Tory Maid, by Herbert Baird Stimpson
  • The most important influence of equity has been exercised in mortgage and trusts in the doctrine of specific performance of contracts concerning real estate, and in relief from forfeiture for breach of covenant.
  • This was approved on March 28, 1787; and a further act of the same day added a penalty of fine to that of forfeiture for the illegal introduction of slaves. Cited from American Negro Slavery, by Ulrich Bonnell Phillips
  • Settlement agreement of $422.5 million, including a $185 million criminal fine and forfeiture for the off-label promotion of the anti-epilepsy drug Trileptal.
  • Having first set up business again at Windsor for a short time, Colburn paid a forfeiture for breaking the covenant not to commence publishing within twenty miles of London, and opened a house in Great Marlborough Street.
  • The federal mail fraud statute authorized civil forfeiture as a punishment for any conviction, and criminal in personam forfeiture for "special circumstances" frauds that victimized a financial institution.
  • Indecency fines are, in fact, rarely issued by U.S. regulators -- no broadcaster has been issued a forfeiture for indecent content since 2003, although several earlier cases are in appeals court.
  • That which seemed worthy of praise was forgotten, his errors were magnified; and the seducer made himself secure by crushing his victim, compromising the respectability of his parents, making the disgrace a forfeiture for life. Cited from Our World, by Francis Colburn Adams
  • An Act was passed prohibiting a member of the Roman Catholic Church from celebrating the rites of his faith on pain of forfeiture for the first offence, a year's imprisonment for the second, and imprisonment for life for the third.
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