fluffy ball

20 examples (0.01 sec)
  • Before the seeds are scattered each head is like a round white fluffy ball. Cited from Wildflowers of the Farm, by Arthur Owens Cooke
  • Even the puppy, which we left a fluffy ball, seems to have grown inches. Cited from Lady's Life on a Farm in Manitoba, Mrs. Cecil Hall
  • These are sea-birds, and look like grey, fluffy balls. Cited from Three Years in Tristan da Cunha, by K. M. Barrow
  • The little fluffy balls, when they saw their mother so employed, all scampered like mad after her, to surround her. Cited from The Adventures of Joel Pepper, by Margaret Sidney
  • When he was only a round fluffy ball he would try to climb into my lap whenever I went to see the kittens. Cited from On the Edge of the War Zone, by Mildred Aldrich
  • The white fluffy ball of the cat unrolled very slowly. Cited from Three Soldiers, by John Dos Passos
  • When Peter first saw him he was crouched on one end of the log, a fluffy ball of reddish-brown, black and gray feathers. Cited from The Burgess Bird Book for Children, T. Burgess
  • Phronsie, meanwhile, picked herself up, and eagerly entered into the chase, gurgling in delight as she pattered first after one little fluffy ball, and then another. Cited from The Adventures of Joel Pepper, by Margaret Sidney
  • One day, when the prince was old enough to run quite fast by himself, he looked from the terrace across the moat, and saw a little soft fluffy ball of a dog jumping and playing on the other side. Cited from The Brown Fairy Book, by Andrew Lang, Ed.
  • Those worms spun fluffy balls of silk, called cocoons, that the old lady reeled her silk thread from. Cited from That Old-Time Child, Roberta, by Sophie Fox Sea
  • A small maltese kitten, curled into a fluffy ball, slept on the snowy counterpane beside her. Cited from A Spinner in the Sun, by Myrtle Reed
  • Thus, in September, in one instance, the fall commenced with fluffy balls and then passed to tapioca snow, sago snow, six-rayed stars and spicules. Cited from The Home of the Blizzard, by Sir Douglas Mawson
  • In front of it the white cat was rolled into a fluffy ball in which ears and nose made tiny splashes of pink like those at the tips of the petals of certain white roses. Cited from Three Soldiers, by John Dos Passos
  • He had cuffed them soundly whenever they had dared to come within reach of him, but always with the flat, soft palm of his paw, and with just enough force behind it to send them keeling over and over like little round fluffy balls. Cited from The Grizzly King, by James Oliver Curwood
  • The girl lifted Gladys onto the bed and rolled her over into a fluffy ball and rubbed her cheeks and her ears until her furry toes curled, and her loud and grateful purring filled the room. Cited from The Common Law, by Robert W. Chambers
  • Leave her beloved Rhode Island Reds, Peggy was thinking, just as Henrietta had hatched out twelve downy, fluffy balls? Cited from Peggy in Her Blue Frock, by Eliza Orne White
  • The children from the North watched as the colored pickers pulled off the great, fluffy balls of white, stuffing them into bags or baskets which were later taken from the field on two-wheeled mule carts. Cited from Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue in the Sunny South, by Laura Lee Hope
  • But on arid ground, the Micropus erectus, or upright micropus, abounds and is a satisfactory substitute for the Filago so far as its tiny, cottony leaves and its little fluffy balls of flowers are concerned. Cited from Bramble-Bees and Others, by J. Henri Fabre
  • A child's breath puffing out the time of day, a vireo plucking at the fluffy ball for lining to put in its nest, the summer breeze, the scythe, rake, and mowing machines, sudden gusts of winds sweeping the country before thunderstorms - these are among the agents that set the flying vagabonds free. Cited from Wild Flowers, by Neltje Blanchan
  • A child's breath puffing out the time of day, a vireo plucking at the fluffy ball for lining to put in its nest, the summer breeze, the scythe, rake, and mowing machines, sudden gusts of winds sweeping the country before thunderstorms -- these are among the agents that set the flying vagabonds free. Cited from Wild Flowers Worth Knowing, by Neltje Blanchan