fickle as

70 examples (0.03 sec)
  • She may be as fickle as a man, but it will be in a different way. Cited from Sex And Common-Sense, by A. Maude Royden
  • But yesterday and I felt that all women were as fickle as these waters. Cited from Dawn, Mrs. Harriet A. Adams
  • I know, thou art as fickle as a child. Cited from Chitra, a Play in One Act, by Rabindranath Tagore
  • But love, inspired by such attractions as these and nothing else, is ever fickle as the wind. Cited from Woman: Man's Equal, by Thomas Webster
  • Even when he is on the side of the truth he is as fickle as the children of falsehood. Cited from Heretics, by G. K. Chesterton
  • "Nothing is certain in this world, and race-horses are said to be as fickle as your sex, dear lady." Cited from Adrien Leroy, by Charles Garvice
  • It seemed that he was fickle then, fickle as everyone declared him to be. Cited from The Knave of Diamonds, by Ethel May Dell
  • Modesty is as fickle as fashion and assumes almost as many different forms as dress itself. Cited from Primitive Love and Love-Stories, by Henry Theophilus Finck
  • However, the dreaded Bay, fickle as usual, saw fit to receive them at first with a smiling face. Cited from A Master of Fortune, by C. J. Cutcliffe Hyne
  • "Do you think I am so fickle as that, Florence?" she asked, and her tone was a little hurt. Cited from Half a Dozen Girls, by Anna Chapin Ray
  • "Fickle as the winds" is our death-seal upon a man; but should we like our winds unfickle? Cited from The Wit and Humor of America, Volume IV. (of X.), by Various
  • Fortune with me may prove as fickle as It did with poor lamented NICHOLAS. Cited from Punch, Vol. 152, April 11, 1917, ed. by Sir Owen Seaman
  • "Fickle as the winds" is our death-seal upon a man; but should we like our winds un-fickle? Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 10, No, 59, Sep, 1862
  • But I'm ne'er as fickle as you think. Cited from The Treasure of Heaven, by Marie Corelli
  • Electors are not so fickle as an irrational method of voting made them appear to be. Cited from Proportional Representation, by John H. Humphreys
  • She was fickle as fortune which, as he plunged and covered, sometimes smiled and again wore a frown. Cited from Rimrock Jones, by Dane Coolidge
  • Success, which usually is as fickle as justice, took long strides and doubled its stations in order to reach Amedee. Cited from A Romance of Youth by Francois Coppee, v3
  • It has its moods both grave and gay, and is as fickle as a schoolgirl. Cited from Byways Around San Francisco Bay, by William E. Hutchinson
  • He had a king to pacify -- wayward as a child, fickle as a lady's favour. Cited from Traditions of Lancashire, Volume 1 (of 2), by John Roby
  • These young lads are as fickle as the weather-cock, and have half-a-dozen fancies in as many weeks. Cited from Love and Life, by Charlotte M. Yonge
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